Study+Guide+for+Exam+2

Study+Guide+for+Exam+2 - 06/05/2010 01:25:00 space...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
06/05/2010 01:25:00 Exam 2 Review Sheet PSC 1 – Spring 2010 Material from the textbook not covered in lecture is italicized. Lecture 6     Sensation vs. perception Sensation--- detect information from the environment Perception--- select, organize, and interpret sensations Stimulus (raw energy)  light, sound, smell, etc Receptors  eyes, ears, nose, etc Transduction  raw energy is converted to neural signals Senses: vision, taste, smell, hearing,  Vestibular  responds to gravity and keeps you informed of your body’s location in  space Somatosensory  the somatosensory cortex in the brain’s parietal lobe. Some  cells in the somatosensory cortex function like the feature detectors discovered in  vision. They respond to specific features of touch, such as a movement across the skin  in a particular direction. Measuring the sensory experience Psychophysics 
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Absolute threshold  the minimum level of stimulation that can be detected. The  point at which a stimulus can be detected 50% of the time. Signal Detection Theory (Hit/Miss/False-alarm/Correct-rejection) Signal-detection theory proposes that the detection of stimuli involves decision  processes as well as sensory processes, which are both influenced by a variety of  factors besides stimulus intensity Weber’s law Weber’s law states that the size of a just noticeable difference is a constant  proportion of the size of the initial stimulus. Subliminal signal, subliminal priming subliminal perception—the registration of sensory input without conscious  awareness Sensory adaptation Sensory adaptation is a gradual decline in sensitivity to prolonged stimulation.  sensory adaptation probably is a behavioral adaptation that has been sculpted by  natural selection. Sensory adaptation also shows once again that there is no one-to-one  correspondence between sensory input and sensory experience. Pain (uniqueness, function) Pain pathways: C fibers, A-delta fibers The slow pathway depends on thin, unmyelinated neurons called C fibers,  whereas the fast path- way is mediated by thicker, myelinated neurons called A-delta  fibers
Background image of page 2
Brain areas involved in pain perception Pain sensory input relayed by Thalamus --Somatosensory Cortex-- Other areas  of the Limbic System-- Prefrontal Cortex Gate Control Theory Gate-control theory holds that incoming pain sensations must pass through a  “gate” in the spinal cord that can be closed, thus blocking ascending pain signals. The  gate in this model is not an anatomical structure but a pattern of neural activity that 
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 14

Study+Guide+for+Exam+2 - 06/05/2010 01:25:00 space...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online