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Chemistry_1031_day24_032309_actual

Chemistry_1031_day24_032309_actual - Dr Jonathan M Smith...

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Dr. Jonathan M. Smith Monday, March 22
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y Overview y Energy: Ch. 6 y Units y Energyflow y Heat capacity y Chemical Equations: Reactions and Solutions Ch. 4 y Limiting reactant y Solutions y Precipitation y Acid/base reactions y Gases: Ch. 5 y PV = nRT y Kinetic theory y In class exam Wednesday y Example questions posted y solutions posted later today y Similar format y Review 5 PM Tuesday Room = ? (not this room)
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Chapter 6 Thermochemistry
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4 y when a system absorbs heat, its temperature increases y the increase in temperature is directly proportional to the amount of heat absorbed y the proportionality constant is called the heat capacity, C y units of C are J/°C or J/K q = C x Δ T y the heat capacity of an object depends on its mass y 200 g of water requires twice as much heat to raise its temperature by 1°C than 100 g of water y the heat capacity of an object depends on the type of material y 1000 J of heat energy will raise the temperature of 100 g of sand 12°C, but only raise the temperature of 100 g of water by 2.4°C
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5 y measure of a substance’s intrinsic ability to absorb heat y the specific heat capacity is the amount of heat energy required to raise the temperature of one gram of a substance 1°C y C s y units are J/(g °C) y the molar heat capacity is the amount of heat energy required to raise the temperature of one mole of a substance 1°C y the rather high specific heat of water allows it to absorb a lot of heat energy without large increases in temperature y keeping ocean shore communities and beaches cool in the summer y allows it to be used as an effective coolant to absorb heat
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Chemistry_1031_day24_032309_actual - Dr Jonathan M Smith...

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