sport project FIGURESKATING

sport project FIGURESKATING - difference and body...

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Unformatted text preview: difference and body development, including changes in body composition, are evident when compar ing these pictures. mmons/7/7e/Kimmie_Meissner.jpg >. e-meissner.jpg>. eded by both male and female figure skat ers t o enhance their per for mances and routines. pg>. Bob-Thomas-Spor ts-Photography>. emininity behind the design, which discourages many males from par ticipating in the spor t. 550-kimmie-meissner-us.jpg>. 006/AdamsUN01.jpg>. Kinesiology Sport Project: Figure Skating Jake Pace, Lindsey Rodkey, Laura Seal, Zack Wiseberg I ntroduction: What is Figure Skating? Figure skating is a complex sport that combines grace, power, speed, and strength. Figure skating involves individual skating, pair skating, and ice dancing. Figure skating is both a competitive male and female sport. This sport is judged by a point system and can be subjective at times. In this handout, the sociology, motor development, and biomechanics of figure skating will be discussed. Motor Development in Figure Skating: Gender Body Structure Differences Across the Growth and Development Cycle Background Body composition, flexibility, and muscular strength are three components of fitness that are heavily affected as the body ages. While changes in body composition, flexibility, and muscular strength may not have a significant effect on some athletes, these components are quite influential for a figure skater. Their affect also differs among males and females, some of which hinder a figure skater’s performance while others help a figure skater excel. Body Composition (Klavora, pp369), (Benardot, pp155), (Thomson), (Hirtz and Starosta, pp24) o Body composition refers to how much of the body is made up of fat and how much is composed of lean body tissue such as muscle or bone. o During puberty, both boys and girls experience an increase in body fat, but after puberty girls tend to end up with a greater percentage of body fat than boys do. 15% body fat is recommended for men while 25% body fat is recommended for women. 1 o The athlete’s ability to overcome resistance, or drag, in addition to their ability to sustain power (both anaerobically and aerobically) is dependent upon the athlete's body composition. o Maintaining the “ideal” body composition is a key part of training for figure skaters. There are aesthetic and performance reasons for wanting to achieve an optimal body composition, in addition to safety reasons. 2 Weight reduction is an effective way for figure skaters to reduce resistanceGaining muscle mass or weight this way often hinders a skaters performance because the skater is heavier and this may make it difficult to jump and perform moves . A figure skater carrying excess weight may be more prone to injury when performing difficult skills when compared to a figure skater with optimal body composition....
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This note was uploaded on 05/09/2010 for the course KNES 200 taught by Professor Hoffman during the Spring '10 term at Maryland.

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sport project FIGURESKATING - difference and body...

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