Sensation Ch.4brief - Chapter Four Sensation 4-1 4-2 4-3...

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4 - 1 Chapter Four Sensation
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4 - 5 What Do Sensory Illusions Demonstrate? Streams of information coming from different senses can interact. Experience can change the sensations we receive. “Reality” differs from person to person. Our sensory systems create our personal reality.
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4 - 6 Elements of a Sensory System
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4 - 7 Sensation and Biological Aspects of Psychology Organized sensory information is called a representation. Shared features of representations of vision, hearing, and skin senses: Information from each sense reaches the cortex via the thalamus. Representation of world is contralateral to the part of the world being sensed.
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4 - 8 Sensation and Biological Aspects of Psychology (cont’d.) Shared features (cont’d.): The cortex contains topographical representations of each sense. The density of nerve fibers in a sense organ determines how well it is represented in the cortex. Each region of primary sensory cortex is divided into columns of cells that have similar properties. Regions of cortex other than the primary areas do additional processing of sensory information.
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4 - 9 Sound A repeated fluctuation in the pressure of air, water, or some other substance. Produced by vibrations of an object. Wave: Repeated variation in pressure that spreads out in three dimensions.
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4 - 10 Physical Characteristics of Sound A waveform represents a wave in two- dimensions.
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