handout_energy_hydrogenbonds

handout_energy_hydrogenbonds - Ch. 2 Chemistry. Nuclear...

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Ch. 2 Chemistry. Nuclear energy, chemical energy and hydrogen bonds “Nuclear energy” hold the protons and neutrons together in the nucleus of an atom. When you split the nucleus apart, you get a nuclear explosion with the release of heat, light and radiation. “Chemical energy” holds atoms together in molecules; a.k.a. covalent bonds or calories. When you break the covalent bonds, in hydrogen gas molecules, you get a much smaller explosion with the release of heat and light, but no nuclear radiation. “Chemical energy.” Our bodies burn calories from sugar, amino acids, etc. for energy. When you burn calories (break covalent bonds in fats, carbohydrates, protein), the energy is released slowly, avoiding an explosion, and is used to do work.
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Chemical energy. All calories come from plant photosynthesis. Plants take CO2 from the atmosphere, and H2O from the soil, and use the energy in sunlight to rearrange these atoms to form sugar. The calories (covalent bonds) in the sugar are stored
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handout_energy_hydrogenbonds - Ch. 2 Chemistry. Nuclear...

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