ENGRC 3350 Postmodern Story of Learning

ENGRC 3350 Postmodern Story of Learning - POSTMODERN STORY...

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POSTMODERN STORY OF LEARNING
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12/16/09 Dear Mr. Evans, I am writing to you regarding the story of learning about communication and my journey to becoming a reflective and reflexive communicator. Oddly enough, my story of learning about communication generally and organizational communication in particular does not begin with the start of the fall semester and the engineering communications class in which I am currently enrolled. Rather, it begins in June 2009, when I experienced my first taste of the corporate world. I began working for Goldman Sachs as a programmer around this period of time. The next two months served as a culture shock to me. Quickly, thanks to a discussion with my immediate manager, I realized that there was an immense disparity between what is taught in a technical engineering class and what is necessary to succeed in the corporate world. On the second day of work, my manager invited me into his office to get to know me better and to give me some advice for being successful within the firm. Thanks to that meeting, I came to realize that those who rose to success were not necessarily the most brilliant and hard working people, though it was helpful to possess either of these two qualities. Rather, those who rose in the organization were effective communicators. My manager was the quintessential example of such a person who was (self-admittedly) not that brilliant but rose through the ranks to become a vice president at Goldman Sachs, thanks to his effective communication skills. He told me quite straightforwardly that he did not perform very well in his academic career, and he was not the most clever software developer to have worked at Goldman Sachs. Nevertheless, he claimed that his superior ability to communicate was the reason as to why he was so successful. After all, you can
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solve all the complicated math problems in the world and spend time writing the most sophisticated computer programs ever known to man, but it won’t mean a thing if you cannot convey your knowledge and ideas to others because people work almost exclusively on teams in the post-academic world. In order to leverage the knowledge of others as well as gain the respect of others, one must be an effective communicator; they must be able to convey clearly to others their thoughts and needs. If the smartest, hardest- working person in the world cannot communicate his or her thoughts, needs, and ideas to others, then nobody will realize how intelligent or hard-working that person is and that person will not be recognized. In other words, that person will not succeed in a corporate environment. Communication is the medium through which we are connected to others in
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This note was uploaded on 05/10/2010 for the course ENGRC 3350 at Cornell.

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ENGRC 3350 Postmodern Story of Learning - POSTMODERN STORY...

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