Nativism & Immigration Restriction, 1920s

Nativism & Immigration Restriction, 1920s - The...

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The Triumph of Nativism
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Outline for today 1. The big picture of U.S. immigration history 2. Nativism 3. The race argument and the historic immigration restrictions of 1921 and 1924
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Basic Immigration Phases in U.S. History 1. 1607--1820 "Open Door" a. Major: England, Africa b. Minor: Germany, Scotland, Ireland ?? 1.5-2 million persons?? base: 20 million 2. 1820/1860--1865-1890 "Open Door" a. Major: Germany, Ireland b. Minor: England, Scandinavia, China 10 million persons base: 40 million Go to next slide…
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3a. 1890-1916 "Door is closing" a. Major: Poland, Russia, Italy b. Minor: other Southeastern Europe 23.5 million people base 75 million 3b. 1920--1930 "Door is closed, please knock" a. Major: Western Europe, Mexico, Canada b. Minor: Southeastern Europe c. Major migration of African Americans and Mexican Americans through 1970 5.5 million people base: 100 million 4. 1930…1952-- "Door is reopening"…1965—“coming in the back door”… a. Major: Latin America, Asia b. Minor: refugees from communist countries c. Major migration of African Americans and Hispanics d. Illegal immigration 30 million people base: 200 million
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Sources of Immigrants 1881-1890 1891-1900 1901-1910 1911-20 0 20 40 60 80 100 Western Hemispher Asia other Europe Germany N. & W. Europe
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The classic immigrant strategy: Wages from U.S. industries – such as the Carnegie Steel Works in Homestead, PA, pictured here – were sent home in hopes of buying land for traditional agriculture.
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Work for women: factory sweatshop
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O.E.D. definitions
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