Origins of WWII

Origins of WWII - U.S did not want war but Japan provoked...

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The Origins of World War II – An Overview 1. The Asian War 2. The European War 3. U.S. Involvement 4. Historiography of U.S. Entry into WWII
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Mussolini and Hitler in Munich
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The view of Pearl Harbor from a Japanese fighter plane
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Destruction from attack on Pearl Harbor
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Historiography of U.S. Entry into WWII “Historiography” is the study of the way history is written – the history of historical writing. To study historiography is to study the changing interpretations of historians over time. The historiography of the U.S. entry into WWII focuses on issues of responsibility.
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Historiography of U.S. Entry into WWII Traditional View
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Unformatted text preview: : U.S. did not want war, but Japan provoked and attacked. • Conspiracy Theory (early 1950s during Korea): FDR wanted war and provoked it against U.S. interests. • Consipacy Theory Debunked (early 1960s): Pearl Harbor was a colossal blunder, not a conspiracy. • The Hawks (1960s): U.S. did not want war but should have. • The Doves (1960s, 1970s): U.S. wanted war but should not have. “Merchants of Death” pushed FDR to enter war. • Avoiding Extremes (1980s): FDR’s guiding principle is to protect the U.S. from Germany. FDR hesitated but did what he could given operational limitations....
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This note was uploaded on 05/11/2010 for the course GCU 81301 taught by Professor Shaeffer during the Spring '09 term at ASU.

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Origins of WWII - U.S did not want war but Japan provoked...

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