Lecture0312 - Active transport pumps Pumps transport ions...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–7. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
  Active transport – pumps Pumps transport ions and molecules  AGAINST their electrochemical gradient. Pumps can therefore create and maintain  concentration differences of solutes  across biological membranes. e.g. The  sodium-potassium pump   transports sodium OUT of most cells and  potassium INTO cells. Maintains a much  higher [ ] of potassium inside the cell than  outside (and a much lower     [  ] of sodium)  e.g.  Ca 2+  pumps  transport calcium ions  out of cells and help maintain a huge  concentration gradient of calcium across  the plasma membrane.  mM outside and 100nM inside – about a 10 4   – fold difference 
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Active transport - pumps Pumps are enzyme-like proteins  that couple transport to ATP  hydrolysis. The large negative  G for ATP- hydrolysis is used to overcome the  positive  G for transport of a solute  up an electrochemical gradient. Pumps generally only transport in  one direction, although some can be  reversed - a very favourable solute  electrochemical gradient across a  membrane can be used to drive  ATP-synthesis.
Background image of page 2
Active transport – The sodium- potassium pump Each “cycle” of the  sodium/potassium pump (Na/K  ATP-ase) transports:  three sodium ions out of a cell  two potassium ions into a cell Therefore: 1 net + ve charge out of  cell – it is “electrogenic”  For the hydrolysis of one ATP
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Active transport – The sodium- potassium pump The pump has specific binding sites for  sodium and potassium on its intracellular  and extracellular surfaces respectively. Coupling of transport to ATP-hydrolysis  involves the creation of an activated,  phosphorylated intermediate – the  terminal ATP phosphate is transferred to  an aspartate residue on the pump  protein.  The presence of this phosphate then  causes (drives) the conformational  change that transports sodium and  potassium across the membrane
Background image of page 4
Figure 4.44
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Active transport – The sodium- potassium pump The main role of the sodium potassium  pump is to establish and maintain  concentration gradients of sodium and  potassium ions across cell membranes. For  instance, in most animal cells, [Na + ] = approx 100 mM [Na + ] = approx   10 mM [K + ] =   approx  10 mM [K + ] =   approx 100 mM THE ELECTROGENICITY OF THE NA/K  PUMP IS NOT A MAJOR CONTRIBUTOR  TO THE NEGATIVE “RESTING” 
Background image of page 6
Image of page 7
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 05/11/2010 for the course BIOLOGY 105 taught by Professor Richard during the Spring '10 term at George Mason.

Page1 / 25

Lecture0312 - Active transport pumps Pumps transport ions...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 7. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online