Ch09BSC1010Lecture

Ch09BSC1010Lecture - 9 Chromosomes, the Cell Cycle, and...

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9 Chromosomes, the Cell Cycle, and Cell Division
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9 Chromosomes, the Cell Cycle, and Cell Division 9.1 How Do Prokaryotic and Eukaryotic Cells Divide? 9.2 How Is Eukaryotic Cell Division Controlled? 9.3 What Happens during Mitosis? 9.4 What Is the Role of Cell Division in Sexual Life Cycles? 9.5 What Happens When a Cell Undergoes Meiosis? 9.6 How Do Cells Die?
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9.1 How Do Prokaryotic and Eukaryotic Cells Divide? Unicellular organisms use cell division primarily for reproduction. In multicellular organisms, cell division is also important in growth and repair of tissues.
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Figure 9.1 Important Consequences of Cell Division
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9.1 How Do Prokaryotic and Eukaryotic Cells Divide? Four events must occur for cell division: Reproductive Signal : to initiate cell division Replication : of DNA Segregation : distribution of the DNA into the two new cells Cytokinesis : separation of the two new cells
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9.1 How Do Prokaryotic and Eukaryotic Cells Divide? In prokaryotes, binary fission results in two new cells. External factors such as nutrient concentration and environmental conditions are the reproductive signals that initiate cell division. For many bacteria, abundant food supplies speed up the division cycle.
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9.1 How Do Prokaryotic and Eukaryotic Cells Divide? Most prokaryotes have one chromosome, a single molecule of DNA; usually circular . Two important regions: ori —where replication starts ter —where replication ends
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9.1 How Do Prokaryotic and Eukaryotic Cells Divide? Replication occurs as the DNA is threaded through a “replication complex” of proteins in the center of the cell. The ori regions move towards opposite ends of the cell. Proteins in this region hydrolyze ATP for energy for this movement, perhaps by the cytoskeleton.
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9.1 How Do Prokaryotic and Eukaryotic Cells Divide? Cytokinesis begins by a pinching in of the plasma membrane; protein fibers form a ring. As the membrane pinches in, new cell wall materials are synthesized, resulting in separation of the two cells.
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Figure 9.2 Prokaryotic Cell Division (Part 1)
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Figure 9.2 Prokaryotic Cell Division (Part 2)
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9.1 How Do Prokaryotic and Eukaryotic Cells Divide? Complex eukaryotes originate from a single cell, the fertilized egg. This cell results from the union of gametes and contains genetic material from both parents.
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9.1 How Do Prokaryotic and Eukaryotic Cells Divide? Development is the formation of a multicellular organism from a fertilized egg. Development involves cell reproduction and cell specialization.
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How Do Prokaryotic and Eukaryotic Cells Divide? Eukaryote cell division: Signal for reproduction not related to the environment of a single cell, but to the needs of the whole organism. Eukaryotes usually have many
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This note was uploaded on 05/12/2010 for the course BIOLOGY 1010 taught by Professor Febres during the Spring '10 term at Valencia.

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Ch09BSC1010Lecture - 9 Chromosomes, the Cell Cycle, and...

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