MNGT 5590 Integrative Paper

MNGT 5590 Integrative Paper - THE EIGHT STAGE PROCESS OF...

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THE EIGHT STAGE PROCESS OF CHANGE AND ITS RELEVANCE TO CURRENT ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR CONCEPTS Lakisah Mikell Webster University E-mail: lakisahmikell44@webster.edu Prepared for Dr. Douglas Bram MNGT 5590
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INTRODUCTION Change is a concept that takes place everyday within any given organization . Whether dealing with a recession , downsizing, or changes in leadership, the concept of change will happen whether you’re successful or not at meeting any of the organization’s goals . While most companies have trouble initiating change agents , John P. Kotter has formulated an eight stage process of initiating change in order to guide different organizations through the process . In my paper , I will discuss each of the eight stages and how they are relevant to the current topics discussed in organizational behavior and whether the topics support or contradict the process . THE EIGHT STAGE PROCESS Step #1: Establishing a Sense of Urgency At some point, almost every organization has experienced some level of success. But, with each success earned, there’s a point where every company has experienced their fare share of failure. Within formulating their own process for success, becoming stagnant in an ever-changing climate becomes an issue. There’s no pressing factor or pressures to get employees or their leaders excited about upcoming changes. Kotter proposed that in order to start implementing change, there must be a sense of urgency available. Establishing a sense of urgency is crucial to gaining much needed cooperation between employees and their leaders (Kotter, p. 36). While establishing a sense of urgency, Kotter noted that complacency is a key factor in determining how well it will be received (Kotter, p. 36). In order to decrease the sources of complacency, Kotter suggested creating a crisis to allow a financial loss, eliminate examples of excess, set targets so high that they can’t be reached when conducting business as usual, stop measuring
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subunit performances, and “kill the happy talk” from senior management (Kotter, p. 40-44). Once this is accomplished, the urgency level should be raised by analyzing more data about customer satisfaction and financial performances, talk to unsatisfied customers and vendors regularly, have more honest discussions, provide ample information to employees, and use consultants to gather more honest and relevant data for meetings (Kotter, p.44). While some may disagree with Kotter’s tactics for establishing a sense of urgency, there are concepts that further support his initial step. In the decision making process, the decision maker or leader must be able to evaluate and assess the significance of the issues at hand. If there’s an issue that’s low on urgency and has little impact, it has the potential to grow if left unattended (Ivancevich, p.386). Raise the urgency levels on issues that have little impact and let employees know that regardless of the size of the problem, it’s just as important as the major issues at hand. While trying to establish a sense of urgency, have alternatives developed, ready, and available
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MNGT 5590 Integrative Paper - THE EIGHT STAGE PROCESS OF...

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