{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

1202L18 - 0 1 2 3 4 5 Chapter 53 Population Ecology Know...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 53 - Population Ecology 0. Know types of dispersion, and how density estimated (be able to calculate N) 1. Understand both exponential and logistic growth (be able to work problems) 2. Be able to use life table model 3. Understand density dependence 4. Know life history patterns 5. Use human population growth as example Dn/dt = r x N dn/dt=(6x10^-3)(3x10^8)= 18x10^5 R = b-d B= 14/1000 D= 8/1000 R= .014 - .008 = .006 If the pop of the US is 300 mi and 14births and 8 deaths 1000/yr what is the pop growth? 1.800.000 Population Characteristics 0. Population ecology is study of density, dynamics and life history of populations 1. Density is numbers/area estimated from 0. Total counts of plants or sessile animals 1. Mark recapture studies of more mobile animals Mark Recapture Estimates (see Fig. 53.2) 2. If you sample, mark and release, and resample, and marked animals dispersed randomly: 0. No marked in sample 2/ total caught in sample 2 = no. marked in pop. = (no. in S1)/ population size 3. Solving for population size, 0. N = (total in S2)(No. in S1)/No. marked in S2 4. Lets say S1 = 208, S2 = 178, and no in S2 marked = 5 1. Then N = (208)(178)/5 or 7,405 Population Dispersion in Space 6. Populations aggregated or clumped if 1. Organisms are social, or if plants reproduce vegetatively or have poor seed dispersal 7. Populations uniformly dispersed in
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
2. Territorial animals 3. Or orchards of trees 8. Populations have a random dispersion if occurrence due to chance Figure 53.4 Patterns of dispersion within a population’s geographic range Population Growth 5. Growth rate = no. of births - no. of deaths 6. r = b - d, r is intrinsic growth rate 7. Change in numbers over time = 29 N / 29 T 8. Model is 29 N / 29 T = r N or dN/dt = rN 4. If r = 0.3 and N = 10, then 3 individuals added next time interval, so N becomes 13 5. If r = 0.3 and N = 100, 30 individuals added, so N becomes 130. Population size increases rapidly, with “J shaped” curve 9.
Image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern