5-Intro13CNMRF07

5-Intro13CNMRF07 - Introduction to 13C NMR 1 H and 13C...

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Introduction to 13 C NMR 1 H and 13 C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy are powerful tools chemists use to characterize molecules. As the semester progresses we will learn about the different pieces of information that we can abstract from the NMR spectrum. In lab we will focus on the application of the technique and you will cover the theory in lecture during the last few weeks of the semester. Introduction to the basics of an NMR spectra. In 13 C NMR we observe a discrete line (also called a signal or peak) representing each chemically inequivalent carbon. The chemical shift value ( δ , in ppm) designates the position of the peak. Chemical shift values range from 0 to 200 ppm in 13 C NMR. The height of the line is not indicative of the number of chemical shift equivalent carbons and is considered only infrequently. Counting the lines. 13 C NMR can be used to quickly determine the number of chemically inequivalent carbons in a molecule by simply counting the lines. For example see the
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This note was uploaded on 05/13/2010 for the course CHEM 151L taught by Professor Roy,christopher during the Fall '08 term at Duke.

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5-Intro13CNMRF07 - Introduction to 13C NMR 1 H and 13C...

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