Sacco and Vanzetti

Sacco and Vanzetti - Name: _ Period: _ Date: _ U.S. History...

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S ACCO V ANZETTI : A M ODERN P ERSPECTIVE T WO I MMIGRANTS T ARGETED FOR THEIR B ELIEFS Eighty years ago, Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti were put to death by the state of Massachusetts. They had been wrongly convicted and sentenced to death for the robbery and killing of two men, a paymaster and a guard who were delivering wages to a shoe company. During the seven years of their imprisonment, people around the world organized a campaign to save these two men-- both Italian immigrants and anarchists. But despite overwhelming support and the abundance of evidence pointing to their innocence, Sacco and Vanzetti were executed in 1927. To understand why this travesty of justice occurred, we first have to look at the hostile political climate towards immigrants and radicals. Following the First World War, in what became known as the Red Scare, the U.S. government responded to a wave of strikes and political unrest with force. The Palmer Raids of the early 1920s, organized by Attorney General A. Mitchell Palmer, resulted in thousands of radicals, especially immigrants, being rounded up, beaten, and held for days without the right to contact a lawyer or even family. It’s clear from the court proceedings that Sacco and Vanzetti were convicted not because the evidence proved them guilty, but because they were anarchists and immigrants. Sacco, for example, was badgered by prosecutors as to why he dodged the draft rather than fight in the First World
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Sacco and Vanzetti - Name: _ Period: _ Date: _ U.S. History...

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