Work in Sweatshops

Work in Sweatshops - W ORKING I N T HE S WEATSHOPS Harry Roskolenko was only five years old when he saw his first “sweatshop.” He came on a

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Unformatted text preview: W ORKING I N T HE S WEATSHOPS Harry Roskolenko was only five years old when he saw his first “sweatshop.” He came on a visit to bring his father, who worked at a pressing machine, a letter and an apple. Harry Roskolenko wrote: When I arrived at the factory there he was, my father, soaking wet with sweat. It was just an ordinary shop, I discovered, with nothing special about the men, the work, the heat, the dirt, the pay, the boss, the production. It was a factory with a hundred workers stripped down to their pants. All sorts of tailoring, cutting, and pressing machines were whirling, and steaming away. I was fascinated for a few minutes—then I saw my father. I lost the magic of a new place at once. The inventions were gone—and there was a man of fifty, pressing a cloak with a ten- pound steam iron. It was summer sweat, winter sweat, all sorts of sweat; bitter, sour, stinking, moldy – through all the seasons of the year. Not one fan to blow up some wind. The fans were in the boss’s office. Instead of fans there were of the year....
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This note was uploaded on 05/13/2010 for the course USH US History taught by Professor Mize during the Spring '10 term at West Point.

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