The Jungle - Name: _ Period: _ Date: _ U.S. History &...

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T HE J UNGLE B Y U PTON S INCLAIR Directions : Upton Sinclair’s shocking portrayal of Chicago slaughterhouses in the early 1900s, as seen through the eyes of Lithuanian immigrants, raised the public’s awareness and prompted Congress to pass the Meat Inspection Act and the Pure Food and Drug Act. \ Name: ______________________________________ Period: _______ Date: ____________________ U.S. History & Government 11R Mr. Gallucci Entering one of the Durham buildings, [Jurgis and Jokubas] found a number of other visitors waiting; and before long there came a guide, the escort them through the place. They make a great future of showing strangers through the packing plants. But Jokubas whispered maliciously that the visitors did not see any more than the packers wanted them to. They climbed a long series of stairways outside of the building, to the top of its five or six stories. Here was the chute, with its river of hogs, all patiently toiling upward; there was a place for them to rest to cool off, then through another passageway they went into a room from which there is no returning for hogs. It was a long, narrow room, with a gallery along it for visitors. At the head there was a great iron wheel, about twenty feet in circumference, with rings here and there along its edge. Upon both sides of this wheel there was a narrow space, in which came the hogs at the end of their journey; in the midst of them stood a great burly Negro, bare-armed and bare-chested. He was resting for the moment, for the wheel had stopped while men were cleaning up. In a minute or two, however, it began slowly to revolve, and then the men upon each side of it sprang to work. They had chains, which they fastened about the leg of the nearest hog, and the other end of the chain they hooked into one of the rings upon the wheel. So, as the wheel turned, a hog was suddenly jerked off his feet and borne aloft. At the same instant the ear was assailed by a most terrifying shriek; the visitors started in alarm, the women turned pale and shrank back. The shriek was followed by another, louder and yet more agonizing – for once started upon that journey, the hog never came back; at the top of the wheel he was shunted off upon a trolley, and went sailing down the room. And meantime, another was swung up, and then another, and another, until there was a double line of them, each dangling by a foot and kicking in frenzy – and squealing. The uproar was appalling, perilous to the eardrums; one feared there was too much sound for the room to hold – that the walls must give way or the ceiling crack. There were high squeals and low squeals, grunts, and the wails of agony; there would come a momentary lull, and then a fresh outburst, louder that ever, surging up to a deafening climax. It was too much for some of the visitors – the men would look at each other, laughing nervously, and the women would stand with hands clenched, and the blood rushing to their faces, and the tears started in their eyes. Meantime, heedless of all these things, the
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The Jungle - Name: _ Period: _ Date: _ U.S. History &...

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