Final Paper Jehovah's Witnesses

Final Paper Jehovah's Witnesses - Jehovah's Witnesses...

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Jehovah’s Witnesses Cassandra Poe Hum 130 March 26, 2010 Sheila Farr Introduction
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"The Jehovah’s Witnesses are one of the world’s fastest growing religious groups. They are well known for their distinctive beliefs, door to door proselytism, political neutrality, and legal battles for religious freedom. However, as Rodney Stark and Laurence R Ianaccone have recently noted, research on the Jehovah’s Witness is surprisingly scarce. This paper seeks to assist non-Witness scholars interested in studying witness teachings, activities, and institutions. The Watchtower, Awake, and annual yearbooks and many other Witness publications are primary sources readily available in Witness congregations throughout the United States and the world. Most congregations also maintain archives of past publications in their libraries. Any researcher can use these and many other sources to document Witness statements, statistics, trends and organizational developments". Wah (Dec. 2001), History of The Jehovah’s Witnesses The Jehovah’s Witnesses was begun by Charles Taze Russell in 1872. He was born on February 16, 1852, the son of Joseph L. and Anna Eliza Russell. (Slick, October 1, 1967). He
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had difficulty in dealing with the doctrine of eternal hell fire and in his studies came to deny not only eternal punishment, but also the Trinity, and the deity of Christ and the Holy Spirit. When Russell was 18 years old he organized his first Bible class in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. In 1879 he started The Watchtower, what would later be known as The Watchtower Bible and Tract Society, the teaching organ of the Jehovah’s Witnesses. The first edition of The Watchtower was only 6,000 copies, today there are over 100,000 books and 800,000 copies. In 1908 he moved the headquarters to Brooklyn, where it remains today. According to the Wikipedia " Russell's health had become increasingly poor in the last three years leading up to his death. During his final ministerial tour of the western and southwestern United States he became increasingly ill with cystitis, but ignored advice to abandon the tour. He suffered severe chills during his last week, and at times had to be held in position in bed to prevent suffocation. He was forced to deliver some of his Bible discourses sitting in a chair, and on a few occasions his voice was so weak as to be barely audible. Russell, aged 64 died on October 31, 1916 while returning to Brooklyn by train". (Wikipedia The Free Encyclopedia)( n.d.), . The Watchtower Society makes a lot of rules, based on their interpretations of various scriptures, that all Jehovah’s Witnesses must follow. Members are taught that they must turn each other in for any rule violations. If they observe another Jehovah’s Witness breaking a rule and do not report him or her to the elders they are as guilty as the offending party. Anyone breaking any of the Watchtower Society Rules is called before 3 elders in a private meeting that is conducted like a trail. The elders become
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This note was uploaded on 05/13/2010 for the course HUM 130 HUM 130 taught by Professor Isaacs during the Spring '10 term at University of Phoenix.

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Final Paper Jehovah's Witnesses - Jehovah's Witnesses...

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