EMS162L_Optical+Microscope

EMS162L_Optical+Microscope - Introduction to Optical...

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Introduction to Optical Microscopy EMS 162L
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1/15/2010 EMS 162L 2 Sangtae Kim Light - Electromagnetic Radiation • Self-propagating wave in space with electronic and magnetic components which oscillate at right angles to one another and to the direction of propagation and are in phase with one another. Kasap
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1/15/2010 EMS 162L 3 Sangtae Kim Electromagnetic Radiation Kasap
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1/15/2010 EMS 162L 4 Sangtae Kim X-ray diffraction Crystal structures Advanced Light Source f c = λ hc hf E = = Optical Microscopy Grains in metals
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1/15/2010 EMS 162L 5 Sangtae Kim Parts of an Optical Microscope Eyepiece Coarse and fine focus knobs Objective Revolving nosepiece Sample state Lamp housing Nikon user’s manual
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1/15/2010 EMS 162L 6 Sangtae Kim Visible Light – Optical Microscope • Resolution, R – Minimum distance between two objects which can be distinguished. NA = numerical aperture λ = wavelength NA R λ 61 . 0 =
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1/15/2010 EMS 162L 7 Sangtae Kim Perfect Lens • A point source located at a focal plane will result in a collimated beam. hh p f q http://www.biologie.uni-hamburg.de/b-online/e03/03.htm p q h h ion Magnificat = = ' f q p 1 1 1 = +
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1/15/2010 EMS 162L 8 Sangtae Kim Numerical Aperture • Numerical Aperture, NA – Ability of the lens to collect light coming off of a specimen n = index of refraction θ =half the angle of acceptance θ sin n NA = http://www.microscopyu.com/
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This note was uploaded on 05/14/2010 for the course EMS 162l taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '08 term at UC Davis.

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EMS162L_Optical+Microscope - Introduction to Optical...

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