EE204B_Lesson_06_ELectrostatic_Fields-1_

In that case the absolute value signs would be

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Unformatted text preview: arges. In that case, the absolute value signs would be unnecessary. However, in later equations the sign of the charge will be important, so we really need to keep the magnitude part. On your homework diagrams, show both the magnitudes and signs of q1 and q2. Your starting equation sheet has this version of the equation: starting equation sheet has this version of the equation: q1q2 F12 = k 2 , r12 which gives you the magnitude F12 and tells you that you need to figure out the direction separately direction separately. EE204B Electromagnetics Prof. Yong H. Won Spring 2010 8 Lesson 06 Solving Problems Involving Coulomb’s Law and Vectors Example: Calculate the net electrostatic force on charge Q3 due to the charges Q1 and Q2. y Q3=+65μC 30 cm θ=30º Q2=+50μC 52 cm EE204B Electromagnetics Prof. Yong H. Won Q1=-86μC x Spring 2010 9 Lesson 06 Step 0: Think! This is a Coulomb’s Law problem (all we have to work with, so far). We only want the forces on Q3. Forces are additive, so we can calculate F23 and F13 and add...
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