lec2 - TA C162 Computer Programming I Lecture Sessions 1 1...

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1 TA C162 Computer Programming I 1/11/2006 Lecture Sessions 1. Representation of Numbers 1. Digital Electronics 2. Computer Programming Low Level Programming: LC3 Simulator High Level Programming      1. Problem Solving Strategies Flow Charting and Algorithm design issues Translation of Algorithm into High level program 1. Introduction to C Programming
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2 TA C162 Computer Programming I 1/11/2006 Today’s Menu Representation of Numbers Binary Numbers Unsigned Integers Non Positional  Positional Signed Magnitude 1’s Complement 2’s Complement
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3 TA C162 Computer Programming I 1/11/2006 How do we represent data in a computer? At the lowest level, a computer is an electronic machine. Works by controlling the flow of electrons Easy to recognize two conditions: 1. Presence of a voltage – we’ll call this state “1” 2. Absence of a voltage – we’ll call this state “0” Could base state on  value  of voltage??  Problem: Control and detection circuits more complex. Compare turning on a light switch to measuring or regulating voltage
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4 TA C162 Computer Programming I 1/11/2006 Computer is a binary digital system Binary (base two) system : Has two states: 0 and 1 Digital system: Finite number of symbols
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5 TA C162 Computer Programming I 1/11/2006 Computer is a binary digital system Cont… Basic unit of information is the  binary digit , or  bit . Values with more than two states require multiple bits. A sequence of two bits has four possible states: 00, 01, 10, 11 A sequence of three bits has eight possible states: 000, 001, 010, 011, 100, 101, 110, 111 Inference: A sequence of  n  bits has  2   n  possible states.
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6 TA C162 Computer Programming I 1/11/2006 What kinds of data do we need to represent?
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