326mmycology - Mycology and Fungal Diseases Fungi are...

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Mycology and Fungal Diseases Fungi are eukaryotes; they are more closely related to mammals (including humans!) than bacteria Two main morphologies- yeast (unicellular) mold (multicellular) Cell walls have NO peptidoglycan; have chitin Mold filaments are mycelia (hyphae) Molds reproduce mainly via condia (asexual spores) Yeasts reproduce mainly by budding Some fungi are “dimorphic” have both yeast and mold phases (usually at different times) Fungi cause superficial, cutaneous, subcutaneous, and systemic mycoses Cutaneous mycoses Very common! Transmitted by direct contact Diseases are dermatomycoses, ringworms, or tineas Caused by dermatophytes “skin plants” Tinea barbae- beard hair; usually cause by genus Trichophyton Tinea capitis- scalp hair; usually cause by genus Trichophyton or Microsporum
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Tinae corporis- anywhere on body skin; usually caused by genus Trichophyton or Microsporum Tinea cruris (jock itch)- groin area skin; usually
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This note was uploaded on 05/15/2010 for the course BIO 326M taught by Professor Field during the Spring '08 term at University of Texas at Austin.

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326mmycology - Mycology and Fungal Diseases Fungi are...

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