Disc 4 - Discussion session 4: 1. What is Opsonization? 2....

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Discussion session 4: 1. What is Opsonization? 2. Give examples of opsonins. 3. What is the membrane attack complex? 4. Which arm of host defenses does the formation of the MAC fall under? 5. Why is the MAC effective only in the gram negative bacteria and not gram positive bacteria? 6. What are the two main lineages of cells in the blood? 7. What are NK cells? Which lineage do they fall under? 8. Describe two different ways in which NK cells carry out their function. 9. Which cells are classified as phagocytic cells? 10. Which are the 1 st and 2 nd cells to arrive at the site of microbial infection? 11. Which are the cells responsible for phagocytosis of Mtb? 12. What are neutrophils? 13. What are the primary and secondary immune organs? 14. What is MALT, GALT and SALT?
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15. What immune cells and cellular interactions occur in the MALT? 16. Which is the APC in SALT? 17. What is phagocytosis? Describe in detail. 18. How does Mtb persist in the host. 19. What is inflammation? What are the types of inflammation? 20. What are chemotactic factors? 21. Give examples of primary and secondary granules. What is the mode of action? 22. Both PMNs and macrophages are phagocytic cells. Which other additional function do macrophages have? 23. What is diapedesis? What is the difference between lysozyme and lysosome? 24. Why are antibodies not effective against Mtb (even though they might be made)? 1. OPSONIZATION: is the process by which the microorganism or other foreign particles are coated with ANTIBODY and or COMPLEMENT and thus prepared for recognition and ingestion by phagocytic cells 2. C3b (part of the innate/non-specific immune response)
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Antibody (adaptive/specific immune response) They function as a bridge between the microorganism and the phagocyte. Opsonins bind to the surface of the microorganism at one end and to
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This note was uploaded on 05/15/2010 for the course BIO 326M taught by Professor Field during the Spring '08 term at University of Texas at Austin.

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Disc 4 - Discussion session 4: 1. What is Opsonization? 2....

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