Wk 8 Midterm Review 2008

Wk 8 Midterm Review 2008 - Intro to Cultural Anthropology...

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Intro to Cultural Anthropology What will be covered on my midterm?
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Format Fill in the Blank Questions Matching Choice of short essay questions-1 paragraph each
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Resources Films: Cannibal Tours The Veiled Revolution American Tongues
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Resources Lectures: Wks 1-7 Intro to Cultural Anthropology: Meaning of Culture and Anthropological Method Symbolic Anthropology Ideology of Progress Language and Communication Cultural Construction of Gender and Race
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Resources Robbins Book: Chapter 1: Culture and Meaning, pgs. 1-28 Chapter 2: The Meaning of Progress, pgs. 39-45 Chapter 4: The Social and Cultural Construction of Reality, pgs. 113-129
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Resources Spradley and McCurdy Book Chapter 1 (plus intro to chapter) (pgs. 1-7; 7-14) Chapter 2: Language and Communication (pgs. 58-62) Chapter 6: Sapif-Whorf Hypothesis Chapter 29: Run for the Wall: An American Pilgrimage Chapter: 20: Symbolizing Roles: Behind the Veil Chapter 23: Mixed Blood
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Resources Blackboard Articles Dick Hebdidge: From Culture to Hegemony Misconceptions of Veils and Veiling
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Key People to Know Lewis Henry Morgan Benjamin Lee Whorf Edward Sapir Clifford Geertz Victor Turner Samuel George Morton Margaret Mead Franz Boas William E.B. Dubois Ferdinand de Saussure
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Key Idea #1: Introduction to Cultural Anthropology Concept of culture Key research methods of the cultural anthropologist Definition of culture as shared and learned Idea of ethnocentrism and cultural relativism Hegemony How do processes of power affect how culture is produced, and how diverse worldviews and practices are able to coexist (or not?)
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Anthropologicial concept of Culture: The system of knowledge/meanings about the nature of experience that is shared by a people and used by them to both make meaning and negotiate relationships within a cultural context.
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Culture Culture is learned: Behaviors and beliefs are patterned and constructed; they are not random Culture is shared: When two or more people share the meanings they give to experience, they share the same culture Culture changes:
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Culture is NOT GENETICALLY encoded!!! Sometimes the things we do may seem “natural”-i.e., like this is the only way to do something. But culture is not biological or genetic, even though it is frequently unconscious or taken for granted.
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Ethnocentrism The idea that our beliefs and behaviors are right and true, while those of others are wrong or misguided. This is the psychological and moral basis for intolerance of others.
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The Opposing View: Cultural Relativism Cultural relativism is the view that  ethical truth is  relative to a specified culture.  According to cultural relativism, it is never true to say  simply that a certain kind of behaviour is right or  wrong;  rather, it can only ever be true that a certain kind a  behaviour is right or wrong relative to a specified  society.
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Wk 8 Midterm Review 2008 - Intro to Cultural Anthropology...

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