Wk 11A Sweetness and Power

Wk 11A Sweetness and Power - Wk 11A: Globalization Key...

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Wk 11A: Globalization
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Key Terms Globalization Commodities
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Globalization Globalization=the intensification of global interconnection resulting from the transnational flow of people, culture, commodities, capital, ideas, information, technologies across national and regional boundaries
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Early Globalization Sidney Mintz: Sweetness and Power Demonstrates connections between a metropolis (England) and its colonies Uses a historical analysis of a commodity produced in the colonies for consumption in Europe
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Commodities Goods that are the product of “social relations between individuals at work” Goods whose value comes from human labor, which is invested in their very form
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Commodity Exchange and Consumption Once commodities hit the market, they become objects to be bought, sold, and consumed and are divorced from the labor power and social relations invested in their production Commodities become objects that seem to have mysterious origins
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British West Indies or Caribbean Islands and Great Britain Mintz looks at connections between colonial sugar colonies in Caribbean and Great Britain Island economies developed during the colonial period for the production of one product for export to England and later US
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Facts about Sugar Originally, all sugar came from sugar cane Only grown in warm climates Today, 30% comes from sugar beets Beets can be grown in cold climates like US, European Union, Russia Most sugar still comes from cane Today, Brazil is largest producer of cane sugar
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Sugar Cane First domesticated in New Guinea First processed into raw sugar in India and carried to the Americas by Columbus Sugar is not native to the Americas; imported at time of colonization
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Sugar Laborers Since its beginning as a colonial commodity, sugar has been produced by agricultural laborers who own neither the land the cane was grown on nor any productive property
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This note was uploaded on 05/15/2010 for the course ANT 302 taught by Professor Seriff during the Spring '07 term at University of Texas at Austin.

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Wk 11A Sweetness and Power - Wk 11A: Globalization Key...

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