ec-04 - University of Southern California Center for...

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Unformatted text preview: University of Southern California Center for Systems and Software Engineering 1 ©USC-CSSE 05/20/10 Barry Boehm Di Wu August 31, 2009 Stakeholder Win-Win & WikiWinWin University of Southern California Center for Systems and Software Engineering 2 ©USC-CSSE 05/20/10 Outline • Why negotiate requirements? • What is WinWin negotiation? • Doing WinWin negotiation - WikiWinWin University of Southern California Center for Systems and Software Engineering 3 ©USC-CSSE 05/20/10 Why Negotiate • To produce requirements, can you just write down what the customer and user want in the requirements document? University of Southern California Center for Systems and Software Engineering 4 ©USC-CSSE 05/20/10 Why Negotiate • To produce requirements, can you just put what the customer and user want in the requirements document? NO – Software project involves many stakeholders – Stakeholders have different needs/ expectations – Many are in conflict – Reconciling conflict is critical • Spider web diagram • Failures, costly rework if not done well • The best place is in negotiation University of Southern California Center for Systems and Software Engineering 5 ©USC-CSSE 05/20/10 The Model-Clash Spider Web: Master Net- Stakeholder value propositions (win conditions) University of Southern California Center for Systems and Software Engineering 6 ©USC-CSSE 05/20/10 Why Software Projects Challenged 365 respondents and represented 8380 projects. Data source: The Standish Group 1995 University of Southern California Center for Systems and Software Engineering 7 ©USC-CSSE 05/20/10 WinWin • The win-win approach is a set of principles, practices, and tools, which enable a set of interdependent stakeholders to work out a mutually satisfactory (win-win) set of shared commitments. WinWin agreements win conditions stakeholders University of Southern California Center for Systems and Software Engineering 8 ©USC-CSSE 05/20/10 WinWin Negotiation Model Win Condition Win Condition Agreement Agreement Option Option I ssue I ssue involves addresses adopts covers Win Condition: captures individual stakeholders’ desired objectives. Issue: captures conflicts between win conditions and their associated risks and uncertainties. Option: candidate solutions to resolve an issue. Agreement: captures shared commitment of stakeholders with regard to accepted win conditions or adopted options. Win-Win Equilibrium: • All win conditions covered by agreements • No outstanding issues University of Southern California Center for Systems and Software Engineering 9 ©USC-CSSE 05/20/10 Example • Win condition: – Development cost should be zero, including cost of COTS. • Issue: – There is a possibility that no free COTS that will satisfy our desired capability....
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This note was uploaded on 05/17/2010 for the course BIOL 1111 at USC.

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ec-04 - University of Southern California Center for...

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