Traffic jams20080316 - Traffic jams Turn left. No right. I...

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Traffic jams Turn left. No right. I mean left Mar 13th 2008 From  The Economist  print edition Getting from A to B on time is about to become  as easy as ABC  Illustration by David Simonds THERE is nothing more frustrating than turning on to a motorway and getting  stuck in a traffic jam that stretches into the distance. Why did the radio and the  motorway-entry sign offer no warning? The satellite-navigation system shows  a different route—once you get to the next exit. But it leads through the middle  of a town and could be heavily congested, if only because other drivers are  taking the same detour. Perhaps it is wiser to stay on the motorway and hope  for the best?  Traffic jams cost billions in lost productivity and wasted fuel. Cameras and  road sensors aim to give drivers advance warning of problems, but many 
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roads are not covered and the information can be unreliable. Many digital  maps use only signposted speeds to calculate journey times and take little  account of the way traffic flows change during the week and at different times  of the day.
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Now help is at hand. As satellite-navigation devices become more widely 
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Traffic jams20080316 - Traffic jams Turn left. No right. I...

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