tables - Updated 01/23/2006 Reading Financial Tables

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Updated 01/23/2006 Reading Financial Tables http://www.investopedia.com/university/tables/ Thanks very much for downloading the printable version of this tutorial. As always, we welcome any feedback or suggestions. http://www.investopedia.com/contact.aspx Table of Contents 1) Financial Tables: Introduction 2) Financial Tables: Stock Tables/Quotes 3) Financial Tables: Stock Ticker 4) Financial Tables: Bond Tables 5) Financial Tables: Mutual Fund Table 6) Financial Tables: Currency Cross Rate Table 7) Financial Tables: Options Table Introduction Many new investors are intimidated by the pages and pages of numbers in financial newspapers. It's easy to see why. These tables pack a lot of information into a small space and can be complicated unless you know what you are looking for. Learning how to read these tables will help you keep track of your portfolio's performance. This tutorial will take you through six of the most popular financial tables and tickers you see in newspapers, on television and on the Internet. This tutorial will focus on how to interpret the data. How to Read a Stock Table/Quote Open any financial paper and you will see stock quotes that look something like the image below. In this section, we'll explain how to make sense of these tables so that you can use the information to your advantage. (Page 1 of 9) Copyright © 2006, Investopedia.com - All rights reserved.
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Investopedia.com – the resource for investing and personal finance education. These are the highest and lowest prices at which a stock has traded over the past 52 weeks (1 year). This typically does not include the previous day's trading. Column 3: Company Name and Type of Stock. This column lists the name of the company. If there are no special symbols or letters following the name, it is common stock . Different symbols imply different classes of shares. For example, "pf" means the shares are preferred stock . Column 4: Ticker Symbol. This is the unique alphabetic name which identifies the stock. If you watch financial TV, the ticker tape will quote the latest prices alongside this symbol. If you are looking for stock quotes online, you always search for a company by the ticker symbol. If you don't know a particular company's ticker symbol, you can search for it at Yahoo Finance . Column 5: Dividend Per Share. This indicates the annual dividend payment per share. If this space is blank, the company does not currently pay out dividends. Column 6: Dividend Yield . The percentage return on the dividend, dividend yield is calculated as annual dividends per share divided by price per share. Column 7: Price/Earnings Ratio (P/E ratio). This is calculated by dividing the current stock price by earnings per share from the last four quarters. Column 8:
Background image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 05/17/2010 for the course BUS 001 taught by Professor Gra during the Spring '99 term at American University in Cairo.

Page1 / 9

tables - Updated 01/23/2006 Reading Financial Tables

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online