financialstatements - Updated 02/07/2006 Advanced Financial...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Updated 02/07/2006 Advanced Financial Statements Analysis By David Harper http://www.investopedia.com/university/financialstatements/default.asp Thank you for downloading the printable version of this tutorial. As always, we welcome any feedback or suggestions. http://www.investopedia.com/contact.aspx Table of Contents 1) Financial Statements: Introduction 2) Financial Statements: Who's In Charge? 3) Financial Statements: The System 4) Financial Statements: Cash Flow 5) Financial Statements: Earnings 6) Financial Statements: Revenue 7) Financial Statements: Working Capital 8) Financial Statements: Long-Lived Assets 9) Financial Statements: Long-Term Liabilities 10) Financial Statements: Pension Plans 11) Financial Statements: Conclusion Introduction Whether you watch analysts on CNBC or read articles in The Wall Street Journal , you'll hear experts insisting on the importance of "doing your homework" before investing in a company. In other words, investors should dig deep into the company's financial statements and analyze everything from the auditor's report to the footnotes. But what does this advice really mean, and how does an investor follow it? The aim of this tutorial is to answer these questions by providing a succinct yet advanced overview of financial statements analysis. If you already have a grasp of the definition of the balance sheet and the structure of an income statement , this tutorial will give you a deeper understanding of how to analyze these reports and how to identify the " red flags " and "gold nuggets" of a company. In other words, it will teach you the important factors that make or break an investment decision. (Page 1 of 74) Copyright © 2006, Investopedia.com - All rights reserved.
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Investopedia.com – the resource for investing and personal finance education. If you are new to financial statements, don't despair - you can get the background knowledge you need in the Intro To Fundamental Analysis tutorial. Who's In Charge? In the United States, a company that offers its common stock to the public typically needs to file periodic financial reports with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). We will focus on the three important reports outlined in this table: Filing Includes Must be filed with SEC 10-K Annual Report Audited financial statements, management discussion & analysis (MD&A) and schedules Within 90 days of fiscal year end (shortens to 60 days for larger companies, as of Dec. 15, 2005) 10- Q Quarterly Report Unaudited financial statement and MD&A. Within 45 days of fiscal quarter (shortens to 35 days for larger companies as of Dec. 15, 2005.) 14A Proxy Statement Proposed actions taken to a shareholder vote, company ownership, executive compensation and performance versus peers. Ahead of the annual
Background image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 05/17/2010 for the course BUS 001 taught by Professor Gra during the Spring '99 term at American University in Cairo.

Page1 / 74

financialstatements - Updated 02/07/2006 Advanced Financial...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online