airquality2010 (1) - Air Quality Many European cities do...

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Air Quality Many European cities do not meet World Health Organization (WHO) air quality standards for at least one pollutant. In the U.S., about a third of the population lives in areas that do not meet U.S. air quality standards.
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Champaign Air quality http://www.epa.gov/myenv/MYENVIEW.res
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What happens in the lungs? http://www.airinfonow.org/html/lungattack/lu
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Smog Smog denotes “. . . a mixture of pollutants , principally ground-level ozone , produced by chemical reactions in the air involving smog-forming chemicals.” Formed by anthropogenic and/or natural sources
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Health Effects of Air Pollution Some forms of cancer such as lung cancer and skin cancer (from possible depletion of the ozone layer) Damage to vital tissues and organs, such as the nervous system Impairment of lung and breathing function
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Environmental Impacts of Air Pollution Causes property damage Reduces visibility in national parks Harms forests Harms lakes and other bodies of water Injures wildlife
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Lethal Air Pollution Episodes in History Meuse Valley in Belgium (1930) Donora, Pennsylvania (1948) London, England (1952)
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Composition of Pure Air (by Weight) Nitrogen (76%) Oxygen (23%) Argon (1%) Carbon dioxide (0.03%) Variety of other gases in lesser amounts Water vapor
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Natural Sources of Air Pollution Wind storms that spread dust clouds Salt evaporation along the earth’s coasts Production of materials that have a biologic origin (e.g., mold spores, pollen, and organic material from plants and animals ) Forest fires Volcanic eruptions
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Mount St. Helens Erupting May 18, 1980 Source: Reprinted from CDC Public Health Image Library, ID #4726. Available at: http://phil.cdc.gov/Phil/details.asp . Accessed March 27, 2005.
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Volcanoes Volcanic ash can travel hundreds to thousands of miles downwind from a volcano. Fresh volcanic ash is gritty, abrasive, sometimes corrosive, and always unpleasant. Although ash is not highly toxic, it can trouble infants, the elderly and those with respiratory ailments. Small ash particles can abrade the front of the eye under windy and ashy conditions.
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Tephra is a general term for fragments of volcanic rock and lava regardless of size that are blasted into the air by explosions or carried upward by hot gases in eruption columns or lava fountains. Such fragments range in size from less than 2 mm (ash) to more than 1 m in diameter. Large-sized tephra typically falls back to the ground on or close to the volcano and progressively smaller fragments are carried away from the vent by wind.
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Volcanoes The volcanic gases that pose the greatest potential hazard to people, animals, agriculture, and property are sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen fluoride.
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Anthropogenic Sources of Air Pollution Stationary sources Mobile sources
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Stationary Sources Electric generating plants Factories and manufacturing complexes Oil refineries Chemical plants Incinerators
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airquality2010 (1) - Air Quality Many European cities do...

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