EMR Implementation 4.16.10 (1)

EMR Implementation 4.16.10 (1) - What is an Electronic...

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Unformatted text preview: What is an Electronic Medical Record?  An Electronic Medical Record (EMR) digitally captures all the information a physician would normally collect through paper and pen  EMRs can electronically capture patient encounter notes, transmit lab reports and prescriptions Goals of Using the EMR  Provide single, uniform medical record  Ability to access medical records from any location  Improve documentation and coding  Improve research / clinical trials data / enhance quality  Reduce transcription and other rising costs Only 11% of community hospitals have fully implemented EMR systems, while 57% have "partially" implemented systems and 32% have not started.  About 16% of hospitals said they had most or all functions of an EMR in place in 2006, up from 10% in 2005. The rate of EMR use in physician practices is estimated at 20%. Cost is the main barrier to EMR implementation, as cited by 86% of the hospitals responding.  Hospitals estimate they are spending $17,616 per bed -- $12,060 for operating costs and $5,556 for capital costs -- for EMR implementation and use, a number up slightly since 2005. Price Waterhouse Cooper estimated in their 2001 study that the burden of paperwork was about 30 minutes for each and every patient hour. Chart Abstraction and Coding Time Savings as Compared to Manual Processes Savings Using EMR Vs Manual Methods How You Benefit  Integrate vital information into a comprehensive clinical information repository With an integrated electronic medical record system you can manage, share, collect together and protect all of the critical medical information. EMR records don't get lost or misplaced and can be accessed quickly. How You Benefit  Lower costs and better manage risk By consolidating information across your clinical operations you increase the pace of information flow including service delivery, coding/billing accuracy, and better document patient encounters and work — all while reducing your operating costs and providing more consistent application of medicine protocols.  The rapid availability of information 24/7 contributes significantly to better decision making, reduced errors, improved outcomes, and lower malpractice risk. How You Benefit  Improve quality of care Consolidating and integrating your patient information is the key to quality patient care. It provides admitting staff, physicians, to quality patient care....
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This note was uploaded on 05/17/2010 for the course AVI 497 taught by Professor Morrow during the Spring '08 term at University of Illinois, Urbana Champaign.

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EMR Implementation 4.16.10 (1) - What is an Electronic...

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