wastedsolidliqpuid (1) - http:/www.bigbellysolar.com/ Waste...

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http://www.bigbellysolar.com/
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Waste Material perceived to be of negative value Hazardous waste—by-products of society that can pose a substantial or potential hazard to human health or the environment when improperly managed. Possess at least one of these characteristics—ignitability, corrosivity, reactivity or toxicity
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Municipal Solid Waste 4.5 pounds of waste per person per day—increase from 2.7 pounds per person per day in 1960 35.7% Paper 12.2 % yard trimmings 11.1 % plastic 11.4 % food scraps 7.1% rubber, leather and textiles 7.9% metals 5.7% wood 5.5 % glass
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Solid waste management Recycling Landfilling—produce methane Composting Combustion—produce methane
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Hierarchy of Procedures Source reduction—waste prevention Reuse of products Composting of yard trimmings Redesign packaging Recycling Offsite or community Disposal Combustion—with energy recovery landfilling
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Recycling Minimizing waste generation by recovering and reprocessing usable products that might otherwise become waste 1960 6.4% rate of recycling (5.6 M tons) 2003 30.6% rate of recycling (72.3 M tons)
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Recycling rates Auto batteries—93% Steel cans 60% Yard trimmings 56.3% Paper and paperboards 48.1% Alum, beer and soft drink cans 43.9% Tires 35.6% Plastic milk bottles 31.9% Glass containers 22%
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composting The controlled decomposition of organic
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This note was uploaded on 05/17/2010 for the course CHLH 458 taught by Professor Jones during the Spring '08 term at University of Illinois, Urbana Champaign.

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wastedsolidliqpuid (1) - http:/www.bigbellysolar.com/ Waste...

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