BDAN.pdf - STUDIES ON DANIEL Table of Contents 1 Notable...

This preview shows page 1 out of 459 pages.

Unformatted text preview: STUDIES ON DANIEL Table of Contents 1. Notable Dates and Events Related to Daniel 2. Daniel’s Central Theme Page # 3 7 3. Daniels Little Book 19 4. Notes on Revelation 10 27 5. The Historical Chapters of Daniel 37 6. Notes on Daniel 1 45 7. Notes on Daniel 2 53 8. Notes on Daniel 3 63 9. Notes on Daniel 4 81 10. Notes on Daniel 5 91 11. Daniel 5 as the Background to Revelation 16 and 17 101 12. Notes on Daniel 6 111 13. Notes on Daniel 7 117 14. The Jewish View of Tradition 209 15. A Case Study: Mark 7:1-13 217 16. Jesus and Theological Conflict 225 17. The Roman Catholic View of Tradition - Part 1 233 18. The Roman Catholic View of Tradition - Part 2 243 19. Sabbath Controversies and Tradition 253 20. Dies Domini The Horn that Attempted to Change God’s Law 263 21. Notes on Daniel 8 293 22. Notes on Daniel 9 327 23. Notes on Daniel 10 367 24. Ellen White’s View of Daniel 11 379 25. Notes on Daniel 11 (a work in progress) 387 Contact Secrets Unsealed 459 Studies in Daniel | by Pastor Stephen Bohr | visit SecretsUnsealed.org | Page 2 of 459 LESSON #1 – NOTABLE DATES AND EVENTS RELATED TO DANIEL 1445 BC: Israel enters a covenant relationship with God at Mt. Sinai (Exodus 19:5, 6). 1405 BC: Israel begins the conquest of the Promised Land after 40 years in the wilderness (the book of Joshua). 1000 BC: Beginning of the Hebrew Monarchy with Saul and David. 953 BC: Temple built by Solomon is dedicated (2 Chronicles chapters 6 and 7). 931 BC: Jeroboam causes the split of the tribes of the south (Judah) from the tribes of the north (Israel). 723 BC: Destruction of Samaria by the Assyrians leads to the dispersion of the Ten Tribes of the north. The remnants of the Ten Tribes are the Samaritans of Christ’s day. 626 BC: The call of Jeremiah (Jeremiah 25:3) begins his ministry that lasts for about 40 years. 623 BC: Birth of Daniel (2 Chronicles 35:18; in Testimonies for the Church, Volume 4 p. 470 Ellen White affirms that Daniel was 18 when he was taken captive in 605 BC). 621 BC: Josiah’s reformation (2 Chronicles 35:18; Testimonies for the Church, Volume 4 p. 570) Huldah the prophetess leads Israel in a great reformation when the book of the law is discovered in the temple (2 Kings 22:14-20). Daniel grew up during this reformation. 612 BC: Babylon conquers Nineveh, the capital of the waning Assyrian Empire (predicted by the prophecy of Nahum). 605 BC: Daniel and his friends are taken captive to Babylon by King Nebuchadnezzar (Daniel 1). 605-536 BC: Jeremiah’s prophecy of the 70 year captivity begins and ends (Jeremiah 25:11, 12). The book of Lamentations was sung by the Hebrew captives on the way to Babylon and Psalm 137 was sung by them while in Babylon. 597 BC (March 15): After Judah rebelled and sided with Egypt, Nebuchadnezzar took Jerusalem for a second time and Ezekiel was taken captive to Babylon. Studies in Daniel | by Pastor Stephen Bohr | visit SecretsUnsealed.org | Page 3 of 459 588-586 BC: Jerusalem was besieged and destroyed by Nebuchadnezzar (described in 2 Chronicles 36:15-21). 539 BC: The fall of Babylon (prophesied in Jeremiah 50 and 51 and Isaiah 47 and described in Daniel 5). 536 BC: Cyrus issues the decree to rebuild the temple in Jerusalem. The Seventy year captivity comes to an end (605-536 BC). 535-520 BC: Rebuilding of the temple is suspended due to opposition by the Samaritans. 520-515 BC: The temple rebuilt and finished (described in the books of Haggai and Zechariah). 483 BC: The story of Esther. 457 BC: The decree of King Artaxerxes Longanimus marks the beginning of the seventy weeks and allows the Jews to reestablish its civil and religious institutions. 408 BC: The walls of Jerusalem rebuilt and finished by Nehemiah in troublous times (the book of Nehemiah). 425 BC: Malachi was the last prophet of the Old Testament but the promise of Elijah to come closes the Old Testament period with a note of hope (Malachi 4:4, 5). 331 BC: The kingdom of Persia falls and the kingdom of Greece takes its place in history. 168 BC: The kingdom of Greece falls and the Iron Empire of Rome begins its rule. 27 AD (spring and fall): John the Baptist prepares the way in the spring for the Messiah’s anointing in the fall. 31 AD: Messiah is crucified on the 14th day of Nissan at 3 o’clock in the afternoon as the Passover Lamb (Exodus 12:5, 6; Leviticus 23:5; 1 Corinthians 5:7, 8). 31 AD: Messiah rests in the tomb on the 15th of Nissan (on the Seventh-day Sabbath as the Unleavened Bread and the Manna; Leviticus 23:6-8; Acts 2:25-32). 31 AD: Messiah resurrects on the 16th of Nissan and presents Himself as the first-fruits to His Father at 9 o’clock in the morning (Leviticus 23:9-14; 1 Corinthians 15:23; Acts 2:15). 31 AD: (forty days after the resurrection): Jesus ascends to heaven (Acts 1:9-11). 31 AD: (ten days before Pentecost) Jesus is invested as High Priest and receives the promise of the Spirit to pour out upon His disciples. Meanwhile the disciples prepare to receive the Spirit in the Upper Room (Acts 1; Revelation 4; Leviticus 8; Psalm 133). 34 AD: The stoning of Stephen marks the close of probation for the Jewish theocracy (Acts 7). 70 AD: Jerusalem destroyed by the Roman Armies under General Titus (Daniel 9:26, 27; Luke 19:41-44; Matthew 24:15; Matthew 22:7). 476 AD: The final fall of the Roman Empire and the beginning of ‘divided Rome’ (Daniel 2:41-43). Studies in Daniel | by Pastor Stephen Bohr | visit SecretsUnsealed.org | Page 4 of 459 508 AD: Clovis King of the Franks lends the help of the civil power to the papacy for the first time. Beginning of the 1290 and 1335 days/years (Daniel 12:11, 12; 11:31). 538 AD: The beginning of the 1260 days/years and the dominion of papal Rome (Daniel 7:25; Revelation 12:14; 13:5). 1798 AD: The end of the 1260 and the 1290 years marks the conclusion of the first stage of papal dominion. 1843 AD: The end of the 1335 days/years (Daniel 12:12). 1844 AD: The beginning of the investigative judgment in heaven in fulfillment of the prophecy of the 2300 days of Daniel 8:14. Date Unknown: Close of human probation (Daniel 12:1). Studies in Daniel | by Pastor Stephen Bohr | visit SecretsUnsealed.org | Page 5 of 459 Studies in Daniel | by Pastor Stephen Bohr | visit SecretsUnsealed.org | Page 6 of 459 LESSON #2 – DANIEL’S CENTRAL THEME Ellen White on the Central Theme of Daniel “In the annals of human history the growth of nations, the rise and fall of empires, appear as dependent on the will and prowess of man. The shaping of events seems, to a great degree, to be determined by his power, ambition, or caprice. But in the word of God the curtain is drawn aside, and we behold, behind, above, and through all the play and counterplay of human interests and power and passions, the agencies of the all-merciful One, silently, patiently working out the counsels of His own will.” Education, p. 173 Three Key Phrases Dan 2:20-21: Three key phrases reveal the central theme of the book of Daniel: “Daniel answered and said: "Blessed be the name of God forever and ever, for wisdom and might are His. And He [1] changes the times and the seasons; He [2] removes kings and raises up kings; He [3] gives wisdom to the wise and knowledge to those who have understanding.” The idea of the ‘change’ of times is found in some very interesting places in the book of Daniel. The word basically means that God is in charge of the historical events of nations and individual persons. In Daniel 3:28 we are told that the three young Hebrews changed the king’s word (actually God did). In Daniel 6:8, 17 we are told that the law of the Medes and Persians could not be changed but God changed and overturned it. In Daniel 4, when the king was looking forward to many years of prosperity, God changed his plans and made seven times pass over him before he recovered his sanity. Daniel 7:25 uses the same word to describe the little horn thinking that it could control times. On an individual level the Psalmist exclaimed to God: “My times are in your hand” (Psalm 31:15). Central Theme in Daniel 1 Daniel 1:1, 2: The two sides in the conflict are introduced Two kings: Jehoiakim versus Nebuchadnezzar Two gods: Yahweh versus Marduk Two cities: Babylon versus Jerusalem Two temples: the temple of God versus the temple of Marduk Studies in Daniel | by Pastor Stephen Bohr | visit SecretsUnsealed.org | Page 7 of 459 Two peoples: The Hebrews versus the Babylonians On the surface, Nebuchadnezzar appeared to have the upper hand. He and his god appeared to be more powerful than Jehoiakim and His God. But Daniel 1:1, 2 removes the veil and shows that Nebuchadnezzar prevailed only because God allowed it. It was necessary that Daniel end up in Babylon because God had a very important work for him there: Daniel 1:1,2: “In the third year of the reign of Jehoiakim king of Judah, Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon came to Jerusalem and besieged it. 2 And the Lord gave Jehoiakim king of Judah into his hand, with some of the articles of the house of God, which he carried into the land of Shinar to the house of his god; and he brought the articles into the treasure house of his god.” Change of Diet Daniel 1:5: The king appoints the diet The king appeared to have control by appointing the diet of Daniel and his friends. This diet differed radically from the original diet that God had appointed in Eden: Daniel 1:5: “And the king appointed for them a daily provision of the king's delicacies and of the wine which he drank, and three years of training for them, so that at the end of that time they might serve before the king.” The king attempted to control the diet of Daniel and his friends in this way exhibiting his sovereignty over them. But then Daniel and his friends refused to eat his rich food and drink his wine. This refusal on the part of Daniel and his friends reveals that Nebuchadnezzar was not in full control. Daniel 1:8: “But Daniel purposed in his heart that he would not defile himself with the portion of the king's delicacies, nor with the wine which he drank.” Change of Names Daniel 1:7: The king changed the names of the Hebrew worthies. In the Bible the name is a revelation of the person’s character: Daniel 1:7: “To them the chief of the eunuchs gave names: he gave Daniel the name Belteshazzar; to Hananiah, Shadrach; to Mishael, Meshach; and to Azariah, Abed-Nego.” The king appeared to be in control because he changed the names of Daniel and his friends. That the change had an intentional purpose is seen in Daniel 4:8 where Nebuchadnezzar brags that he changed Daniel’s name to Belteshazzar to honor his gods rather than the God of Daniel. Daniel 5:12 Although the eunuch changed the names he did so because the king instructed him to do so: Studies in Daniel | by Pastor Stephen Bohr | visit SecretsUnsealed.org | Page 8 of 459 Daniel 5:12: “Inasmuch as an excellent spirit, knowledge, understanding, interpreting dreams, solving riddles, and explaining enigmas were found in this Daniel, whom the king named Belteshazzar, now let Daniel be called, and he will give the interpretation." Daniel 4:8: “But at last Daniel came before me (his name is Belteshazzar according to the name of my god).” Nebuchadnezzar’s desire to control is revealed in the rest of the book by the fact that the king always refers to the Hebrew worthies by their Babylonian names. But God and the Hebrew worthies employ their Hebrew names. Change of Education The king’s desire to exhibit his control is also revealed by the fact that he had the Hebrew worthies enrolled in the educational system of Babylon. He wanted to change their religion and world view by putting them into the school of Babylon with the wise men; but the young men were not buying! Daniel and his friends never used the divination methods of the wise men. In fact, they were hated by the wise men because of their religious principles. Daniel and his friends made up their minds that they would be faithful to the God of their fathers and God rewarded them by giving them true wisdom from heaven. Daniel 1:17: “As for these four young men, God gave them knowledge and skill in all literature and wisdom; and Daniel had understanding in all visions and dreams.” The result of their faithfulness was apparent: Daniel and his friends were ten times better than all the wise men which ate Babylon’s food and studied in the Babylon’s school. Because of their faithfulness God brought them to prominence in the kingdom. Central Theme in Daniel 2 God’s control of history is revealed in several details in the story of Daniel 2. First of all, according to Daniel 2:29, God was able to read the king’s thoughts when he went to bed: Daniel 2:29: “Thoughts came to your mind while on your bed about what would come to pass after this.” Because God knew what the king was thinking, He gave him a dream to reveal what he wanted to know. God then gave the king amnesia. The purpose of the amnesia was to unmask the wise men and reveal before the world that the religion of Babylon was bankrupt and that the religion of Daniel was superior. Daniel did not use the forbidden methods of the wise men. His only method was prayer to God. He did not practice what he was taught in the school of Babylon. Studies in Daniel | by Pastor Stephen Bohr | visit SecretsUnsealed.org | Page 9 of 459 Now that Satan’s instruments had been unmasked, Satan took advantage of the situation by acting upon the king’s mind to destroy all the wise men and among these were Daniel and his friends. Obviously Satan had seen in these young men a potential future problem and he was going to nip the problem in the bud. God showed that He was in control by revealing the dream to Daniel that He had veiled from the king’s memory. God gave Daniel wisdom to know the dream and its meaning. As Daniel went before the king to tell him the dream and its meaning, he clearly told the king that the course of history is controlled by God: Daniel 2:37-38: “You, O king, are a king of kings. For the God of heaven has given you a kingdom, power, strength, and glory; 38 and wherever the children of men dwell, or the beasts of the field and the birds of the heaven, He has given them into your hand, and has made you ruler over them all — you are this head of gold.” According to Daniel’s explanation, Nebuchadnezzar did not come to the kingdom because of his superior intelligence or mightier weapons. He became king because God determined it that way. God then showed His sovereignty over human history by revealing how it would flow from Daniel’s day until the end of time. Only the One who knows the future in advance can mold the course of history to fulfill his plan. Daniel clearly showed the king that God will have the last word. Satan intended to have Daniel and his friends killed along with the wise men but instead, God brought them to prominence in the kingdom where they could be in close contact with the king. The Central Theme in Daniel 3 God had delineated in Daniel 2 the sequence of kingdoms that would arise between the days of Nebuchadnezzar and the second coming of Jesus. Nebuchadnezzar did not like the scenario that God had presented and he attempted to change God’s prophetic scenario—the times. The king was saying: ‘History will unfold according to my scenario. I am in control.” There are several links between Daniel 2 and 3: The word “gold” in Daniel 2 and 3 links the chapters. The word “image” is identical in both chapters. The expression “I have set up” is repeatedly used in the chapter (verses 1, 2, 3 [2 times], 5, 7, 12, 14, 15, 18). Remember that in Daniel 2 God had stated that He was going to “set up” his eternal and indestructible kingdom (3:1, 2, 3, 7, 12, 14, 15 and 18) so the king set up an image to announce that his kingdom would be eternal and indestructible. Studies in Daniel | by Pastor Stephen Bohr | visit SecretsUnsealed.org | Page 10 of 459 All the power and control appear to be in the king’s hand as the story in Daniel 3 unfolds. The king raises the image in defiance of God’s perspective of history. He commands everyone to worship the image. All nations, tongues and peoples bow to the king’s command. He utters a death decree against anyone who fails to recognize his authority. He heats the furnace seven times hotter than ever before. He has the young men thrown into the furnace. But the story clearly shows that the power and control of the king are limited. While the whole world follows the order of the king, there is a small remnant of three who contested his supremacy—they were the allies of the God of heaven. The king’s power and authority was not absolute. In fact, it is limited because he could not force the young men to worship his image. They refused to recognize the king’s perspective of human history. They were loyal to the God of heaven. The king defiantly claimed to be greater than the God of the Hebrews when he said to them: Daniel 3:15 (NIV): “…What God shall be able to deliver you from my hand?” The three young men answered the king: Daniel 3:16, 17: “…O Nebuchadnezzar, we have no need to answer you in this matter. 17 If that is the case, our God whom we serve is able to deliver us from the burning fiery furnace, and He will deliver us from your hand, O king.” Nebuchadnezzar then exercised his power and control by heating the furnace seven times hotter and throwing the three young men into the furnace. But God spoke the last word. Christ Himself interrupted and overturned the king’s power and authority by coming personally into the furnace to deliver His remnant. A key word that appears at critical junctures in the chapter is the word ‘deliver’. In fact we will discover that this word is found only in Daniel 3, 6 and 1112. God is the one who changes the evil decrees of human kings and delivers his people from certain death. At the end of the chapter the king is forced to admit that the God of Daniel is above all gods. He is not yet a believer in the one and only God but he is well on his way to becoming a humble child of the heavenly king. The Central theme in Daniel 4 At the beginning of chapter 4 King Nebuchadnezzar publicly proclaimed that God is in control of human affairs (Daniel 4:3). But at this point the king perceived God as a great wonder worker, not as a personal God who cares about individuals in the flow of history. Daniel 4:2-3: “I thought it good to declare the signs and wonders that the Most High God hath wrought for me. 3How great are his signs and how mighty his wonders! His kingdom is an everlasting kingdom and his dominion is from generation to generation.” God gave the king the dream of the tree. As a result the king was disturbed and wished to know the meaning. Amazingly, the king called the same charlatans who had failed him in chapter 2 Studies in Daniel | by Pastor Stephen Bohr | visit SecretsUnsealed.org | Page 11 of 459 (4:4 7) and whose scheme against the three Hebrew worthies had been brought to nought in chapter 3. This indicates that the king had not yet totally shed his pagan view of God. According to Daniel 4:13-17 God had given the kingdom to Nebuchadnezzar and He could take it away from him whenever He pleased: Daniel 4:13-17: "I saw in the visions of my head while on my bed, and there was a watcher, a holy one, coming down from heaven. 14 He cried aloud and said thus: 'Chop down the tree and cut off its branches, strip off its leaves and scatter its fruit. Let the beasts get out from under it, and the birds from its branches. 15 Nevertheless leave the stump and roots in the earth, bound with a band of iron and bronze, in the tender grass of the field. Let it be wet with the dew of heaven, and let him graze with the beasts on the grass of the earth. 16 Let his heart be changed from that of a man, let him be given the heart of a beast, and let seven times pass over him. 17 'This decision is by the decree of the watchers, and the sentence by the word of the holy ones, in order that the living may know that the Most High rules in the kingdom of m...
View Full Document

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture