ULI 110 Week02

ULI 110 Week02 - ULI101 Week 02 Week Overview Unix file...

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ULI101 Week 02
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Week Overview Unix file system Types of files File naming rules Hidden files Basic file system commands: pwd,cd,ls,mkdir,rmdir,mv,cp,rm man pages Text editing vi editor Common commands: whoami,w,who,passwd,date,cal,man Common file utilities: cat,more,less,touch,file,find
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Unix File System The Unix/Linux file system is hierarchical, similar to other operating systems today Files are organized in directories Directories may contain sub-directories What is different (from Windows anyway) is that there are no drive letters (such as C:, or D:) All files and directories appear under a single root, even if multiple storage devices are used Learning command-line navigation of the file system is essential for efficient system usage
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Hierarchical File System In the Linux (Unix) OS, the "root directory" / is the starting directory, and other "child directories", "grandchild directories”, etc. are created The hierarchical structure resembles an "upside- down tree“. There is actually a command called tree that can display a “tree diagram”! home public user1 user2 user3 ipc144 nled
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Typical Unix/Linux Directories / Root directory (ancestor to all directories). /home Used to store users’ home directories. /bin Common system binaries (commands). /usr/bin Common utilities (commands) for users. /usr/sbin Common utilities for user administration. /etc General System Admin. Files (eg passwd) /var Dynamic files (log files) /tmp, /var/tmp Temporary files for programs /dev Device files (terminals, printers, etc.)
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Home directory Every user when receiving an account has a “home” directory created This is where you keep your personal files ~ represents your home You can use the ~ symbol in the pathnames A cd command without any parameter will get you directly to your home directory Remember to keep your files private
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Types of Files On a Unix/Linux file system a “file” can be anything To an average computer user a file is a text document, video, music, photo etc. A directory is really an index file, containing references to file locations on the physical disc and other related information Devices such as the terminal or printer are also files You will learn more details about this later in the course Any file (or directory) name starting with a period is considered to be a hidden file
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Types of Files You can use the ls –l command to determine the type of file. For Example: ls -l /dev/tty crw-rw-rw- 1 root root 5, 0 2003-03-14 08:07 /dev/tty ls -l monday.txt w1.c -rw-r--r-- 1 someuser users 214 2006-01-23 14:20 monday.txt -rw-r--r-- 1 someuser users 248 2005-10-12 13:36 w1.c ls –ld uli101 drwxr-xr-x 2 someuser users 4096 2006-01-17 16:43 uli101 Note: you can use the –d option with the detailed listing command to get information for just the directoryfile. eg.
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This note was uploaded on 05/17/2010 for the course CTY ULI101 taught by Professor Mark during the Spring '10 term at Seneca.

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ULI 110 Week02 - ULI101 Week 02 Week Overview Unix file...

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