Cultural Studies Korporowicz_jaskula_stefanovic_plichta_j.pdf - Jagiellonian Ideas Towards Challenges of Modern Times Editors Leszek Korporowicz Sylwia

Cultural Studies Korporowicz_jaskula_stefanovic_plichta_j.pdf

This preview shows page 1 out of 426 pages.

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 426 pages?

Unformatted text preview: Jagiellonian Ideas Towards Challenges of Modern Times Editors: Leszek Korporowicz, Sylwia Jaskuła, Malgožata Stefanovič, Paweł Plichta Kraków 2017 © Jagiellonian Library, Kraków 2017 ISBN 978-83-949716-1-8 Editors: Leszek Korporowicz, Sylwia Jaskuła, Malgožata Stefanovič, Paweł Plichta Peer reviewers: Dr hab. Marcin Brocki, Dr hab. Dariusz Wadowski Translations and proofreading: Jakub Błaszczak, Tadeusz Grzesik, Dorota Janik, Marzena Mcnamara, Anna Sekułowicz Typesetting and page makeup: Martyna Fatel Cover design: Joanna Żółtowska The Jagiellonian Library al. Mickiewicza 22 30-001 Krakow tel. 12 633 09 03 A public task co-financed by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Republic of Poland within the framework of the competition "Public Diplomacy 2017" - the component "Cooperation in the field of public diplomacy 2017". The publication only expresses the views of the authors and cannot be equated with the official position of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Republic of Poland. The publication has been co-financed by the Institute of Intercultural Studies, Faculty of International and Political Studies of the Jagiellonian University in Kraków and the Foundation of Students and Graduates of the Jagiellonian University "Bratniak". Print: Salesian Printing House in Kraków JAGIELLONIAN IDEAS... CONTENTS INTRODUCTION....................................................................................................................................................................9 INSPIRATIONS LESZEK KORPOROWICZ Jagiellonian Values.............................................................................................. 15 JÓZEF ŁUCYSZYN CM The Pragmatic Interpretation of Jagiellonian Ideas ....................................... 37 ANDRZEJ PORĘBSKI Jagiellonian Values in the Freiburg Declaration of Cultural Rights.............. 53 SYLWIA JASKUŁA Jagiellonian Inspirations in Inter-cultural Education..................................... 67 CREATIVE HERITAGE BOGDAN SZLACHTA On the Political Thinking of the Jagiellonian Day.......................................... 85 WANDA BAJOR The Cracovian Precursors of Ius Gentium in the Jagiellonian and Contemporary Periods............................................................................... 99 MAGDALENA PŁOTKA Multidimensionality of the Category of Action in 15th century Kraków Practicism.............................................................................................. 129 KRZYSZTOF WIELECKI Subjectivity in the European Thought. The Significance of Paweł Włodkowic’s and Bartolomé de Las Casas’ Philosophies............................... 153 MARCIN KARAS The Contribution of Nicolaus Copernicus to Jagiellonian Ideas.................... 179 5 JAGIELLONIAN IDEAS... CONTEMPORARY CHALLENGES: THE GLOBAL CONTEXT TADEUSZ PALECZNY Challenges for Ideology and Politics of Multiculturalism.............................. 193 MARTA DĘBSKA The Jagiellonian Ideas in the Contemporary World Order in the Aspect of the National Identity and the Nation-States................................................ 211 ISTVÁN KOLLAI Reinventing the Narrative of Central Europe. The Imaginary Geography of Central Europe in the Era of Global Cultural Consumerism.................... 223 VIL BAKIROV University as the Space of Intercultural Communication.............................. 233 CONTEMPORARY CHALLENGES: THE ETHNIC CONTEXT VOLODYMYR YEVTUKH Cultural Security in Ethnic Diverse Society: Challenges for Ukraine.......... 249 WAWRZYNIEC KONARSKI Between Scepticism and Opposition. Cultural-Political Conditions of Varied Perceptions of the Jagiellonian Idea in Ukraine and Russia.......... 281 SEV OZDOWSKI Importance of Heritage Languages to Australia’s Social and Economic Future................................................................................................................... 303 ŁUKASZ KRZAK The Jagiellonian Idea – Some Political Challenges.......................................... 319 6 FUTURE AND RESPONSIBILITY DOROTA PIETRZYK-REEVES Patterns of Political Thinking and Arguments in Poland–Lithuania: Virtues, Res Publica and Education................................................................... 333 MAREK REMBIERZ Jagiellonian Ideas in Shaping Cultural Identity, Social Pluralism and Intercultural Relations – Historical Reconnaissance, Ideological Bonds and Educational Postulates of Stefan Swieżawski................................................... 345 JOANNA DZIADOWIEC The Jagiellonian Ideas in the Promotion of Intangible Cultural Heritage – the Example of Polish Jagiellonian Fairs................................................................. 379 Authors...........................................................................................................................411 Idee jagiellonskie wobec wyzwAN wspóLczesnoSci – polskie streszczenie............421 JAGIELLONIAN IDEAS... Introduction • Many problems of the contemporary world include challenges already familiar to civilizations, societies and nations of distant epochs. Solutions to some of them, both intellectual and practical, are often forgotten or even unknown, while others have gained stereotypical interpretations, which do not always correspond to the truth. Meanwhile, the skilful interpretation of the cultural heritage of many contemporary nations may be a creative inspiration both in the effort to understand, diagnose as well as shape ways of resolving contradictions, conflicts and posing developmental questions towards the challenges of the contemporary world. The Jagiellonian era is an excellent area for such inspirations. During the three centuries fourteenth, fifteenth and sixteenth, concepts and a network of activities, institutions and legal regulations have been developed, which correspond to similar issues of contemporary Europe in the area of social mobility, multiculturalism, international and intercultural relations, religious tolerance, cooperation of regional, national and supranational communities. This cooperation is noticeable in the field of science, artistic creativity and political culture. It is worth mentioning that many ideas were conceived then, which go far beyond the area of geopolitical relations, and thus beyond what Polish historians called the ’Jagiellonian idea’ in the second half of the nineteenth century. In political terms, it has always had different perception in individual countries that create a specific Jagiellonian space stretching from the Baltic Sea to the Black Sea. Yet, it should be remembered, that the space was not won with a sword, but a discourse of interests, more of less felt sense of community. The purpose of this book, however, is neither to evaluate nor to continue the visions of unity, but to highlight the many, very creative ideas 9 JAGIELLONIAN IDEAS... that have arisen in the fields of science, culture, interreligious relations, public affairs, the concept of the common good, education and rights, as well as the patterns of political thinking in its interpretation of axiology. It is a very diverse world of ideas referring, as in the case of outstanding and still underestimated thought authored by Paweł Włodkowic - to universalizing values that go far beyond national contexts. They create a wealth of inspiration, when one looks at this heritage, not only in terms of political science, but also through cultural sciences, anthropology, cultural sociology, pedagogy, history of ideas, intercultural studies or social communication. The texts collected in the book are mainly the result of work within three seminars and one workshop carried out in 2017, designed in a comparative perspective, successively at the Jagiellonian University in Kraków, the University of Oxford, National Pedagogical Dragomanov University in Kiev and Western Sydney University. Each of these events was a separate, but at the same time corresponding experience, which participants found very interesting. This experience shows the Jagiellonian ideas from a different but complementary side. In all these places, we enjoyed great support from representatives of the local scientific communities, for which we would like to express our great gratitude and hope for further cooperation. Each seminar and workshop, was similar in structure to the one used in this volume, i.e. through the diagnosis of the conceptual layer and basic inspirations, that can be found in the meaning of the Jagiellonian ideas, through the reconstruction and analysis of important historical sources, which form the basis of the cultural heritage of the Jagiellonian era, and then typologizing the important challenges of contemporary culture, seen in relation to the mentioned values. The publication concludes with a chapter which, by analysing the cultural-creative potential of the Jagiellonian idea, outlines possible visions of the future, revitalizing the concept of responsibility, sensitivity and care for the sense of creative reading of heritage in its contemporary development potential. We believe that the cultural heritage of many other national and cultural communities, whose roots are the strength and motivation to take up the challenges of contemporary culture, can be exploited in a similar fashion. • 10 JAGIELLONIAN IDEAS... 11 Jagiellonian Ideas Towards Challenges of Modern Times INSPIRATIONS JAGIELLONIAN IDEAS... Jagiellonian Values • Leszek Korporowicz* Contemporary Europe, as other parts of the world, does not constitute a model of stability, a clear concept of the development and integration of many native and incoming cultures which enter into an intensive period of interaction. It turns out that the long-discussed question of co-existence, synergy, as well as the right to maintain and develop cultural identity has once again become a key issue. On the one hand, the unfettered tendency towards complete liberalization in intercultural relations has met with an unrestrained reaction in the form of nationalist groups past and new, while on the other hand causing destruction of the processes of cultural integration based on the internalisation and realisation of values. Many things indicate that the concept of cultural rights as a variety of human rights whose roots extend into the Jagiellonian debates regarding ‘the Laws of Nations’, does not guarantee cultural security either for ethnic minorities or ethnic majorities. The characteristic situation of a lack of cultural balance appears in the incommensurate character of values constituting a regulator of individual and collective attitudes in which it is more and more difficult to find a common denominator in the sense of the common good, values of human life, as well as religious feelings which have fallen into the trap of socio-technical calculations. Disintegrative problems within the European Union which have been accompanied by a crisis of trust towards political elites and a clear revival of the concept of nation states, require us to question, to a significant degree, the cultural basis of European identity regarding what is worth maintaining within it and what constitutes * Jagiellonian University in Kraków; e-mail: [email protected] 15 JAGIELLONIAN IDEAS... the social order of this part of the world. This order does not require so many forms of protection as it undergoes continual transformation and should not close itself off from new forms of existence, but is forced to recognise and understand new challenges. Many of these we are encountering for the first time, while some are changing types of challenges known from the past, although in new configurations and proportions. Across the entire globe – writes Anna Czajka in a groundbreaking study entitled ‘Interculturality and philosophy’ – entireties are collapsing at an accelerated pace whose permanence is, in the nature of things, relative – and this is in the contemporary world, a global world of migration and mobility, into one space comes the co-existence (but it would be good if co-living was achieved) of people belonging to various cultures. For this situation neither Europe not the world at large is prepared – neither regarding politics, economics, nor, above all, regarding the consciousness and concepts which we employ. […] We neither comprehend nor understand ourselves in situations of change […] but comprehension and understanding of oneself among others and in the world is a core objective of humanities and culture.1 Understanding oneself is not, however, possible without referring to the cultural heritage accumulated within us, an aspect indicated, as Czajka points out, by Antonina Kłoskowska in her sociological-cultural studies analysis but also the concept of ‘Ethnic cultures at their roots’.2 This analysis is important in the context of the discovery by Kłoskowska of the dynamics and consequences of what is termed ‘cultural poly-valence’. This is based on the development of more than two cultures within a space and the building of cultural identity through slow and selective choices which do not destroy the values of any of the cultures but simultaneously create its own creatively configured whole. These processes may not, however, take place without an active centre of personality, thus a cultural self which is willingly, consciously and axiologically capable of making choices, as well as integrating values and arranging them into a hierarchy.3 Without this A. Czajka, Międzykulturowość i filozofia // Interculturality and Philosophy, Warszawa 2016, p. 166. 2   A. Kłoskowska, Kultury narodowe u korzeni, Warszawa 1996; published in English as: National Cultures at the Grassroots Level, transl. C.A. Kisiel, Budapest 2001, published in Italian as: Alle radici delle Culture nazionalli, A. Czajka (ed.), transl. M. Bacigalupo, introduction by Z. Bauman with a letter from K. Dedecius, Reggio Emilia 2007. 3   L. Korporowicz, ‘Tożsamości kulturowe u korzeni’, in: E. Hałas (ed.), Kultura jako pamięć. Posttradycjonalne znaczenie przeszłości, Kraków 2012, pp. 177–202. 1 16 JAGIELLONIAN IDEAS... ability and its genuine development, not only one’s personal and communal world yield to collapse, while even the oldest cultures, including that of Europe, lose their vitality, even their ability to survive. Similarly, therefore, as experience and individual biographies show, cultural communities must develop their own configurative processes taking place in a supra-individual consciousness and identity by strengthening, not weakening ‘the cultural self.’ It is this which is, to a significant degree, responsible for the maintenance and development of their subjectivity. Indeed, the cultural self must not so much limit as transform the processes of cultural poly-valence into real developmental dynamism. Since not all cultural poly-valences result in the effective building of that which inspires linguistic concepts termed ‘cultural syntagma’ by Kłoskowska, they contain, therefore, an internal logic which is favoured with a sense of the configuration of cultural models. Moreover, not all composed poly-valences remain in developmental processes. A major challenge of contemporary culture, not only that of Europe is, adhering to the terminology as proposed by Kłoskowska, the disruption of the balance between the intense development of the processes of poly-valence and the dynamics of creating cultural syntagma of particular societies, in other words, between the disintegration and integration of values. The ability to employ symbolic cultures as a kind of universe of world values is a practical demand of the more necessary anthropology of cultural heritage which is an answer to the multiple challenges facing the contemporary world. The selection, reconfiguration and composition of cultural content is far from the recreation of ready-made models. On the contrary, one may characterise it, as in the example of linguistic competence, as a significant level of creativity, one necessary, as a matter of fact, in situations described by the variability, mobility and fluidity of contemporary civilisation. The animating activities of creators of culture and the overcoming of at least a part of the difficulties arising alongside the intensification of cultural poly-valence, does not have to be condemned to the seeking out of solutions which are completely new with an untested way of functioning and unknown dynamics of their consequences. Many of them may be found through careful analysis and the revival of practices, as well as more general ideas as those worked out as part of the huge baggage of historical experience in the cultural heritage of many nations and smaller cultural groups. These include examples whether laboriously worked-out theoretical concepts may constitute creative inspiration for many areas 17 JAGIELLONIAN IDEAS... of life, both in the sphere of individual reality and that of many nations in terms of the their relations, or also regarding a supra-national reality which includes broader communities as, for example, the European cultural community in all its variety.4 For these reasons, it is worth designing and employing practices of sharing heritage, interpreting it in a creative manner, one open to the challenges of modernity, able to find values which are specific, contextual and appropriate for a particular community in a particular time and place, but also values of a supra-contextual character with a significant universalising character. The creative employment of cultural heritage is a form of communication and abilities to actively interact both with contemporaries, of a closer and further kind of community, but also with those who have left behind something of equal value, although one which is distant in time, sometimes forgotten and which should be subjected to its own deciphering, reconstruction and translation into our contemporary language.5 In this way, one may discuss the communication of heritage which is not a one-way process and, therefore, only a historical message coming from our ancestors towards modernity. This may be, and often is our answer and, therefore, a characteristic interaction with a third party which we subject to interpretation, sometimes to redefinition and inculturation in modern cultural conditions. Jagiellonian Ideas from an anthropological perspective The period and heritage which, in many regards, has turned out to be a contemporary source of inspiration is the enormous achievements of the Jagiellonian era. In the sphere of interactive competence, the ability to see the common good above changing particularist interests, as well as the practical field of multi-cultural policy, this period achieved a level deserving of the greatest attention. There exist several reasons for which this period provides many analogies for contemporary times, namely: • An interest in those things in a person which are indivisible and inseparable, which results from natural law as the basis M.A. Murzyn, J. Purchla (ed.), Cultural Heritage in the 21st Century. Opportunities and Challenges, transl. J. Taylor-Kucia, Kraków 2007; H. Joas, K. Wiegandt (ed.), Kulturowe wartości Europy, transl. M. Bucholc, M. Kaczmarczyk, Warszawa 2012. 5   L. Korporowicz, ‘Bridges of hope. World Youth Days – the way of building intercultural communities’, in: J. Stala, A. Porębski (ed.), World Youth Days. A Testimony to the Hope of Young People, Kraków 2016, pp. 319–330. 4 18 JAGIELLONIAN IDEAS... of their humanity, but always in a complete dimension the variety of forms of their life, considering it to be a kind of human fulfilment, expression and richness. • A conviction regarding the possibilities and values of cooperation in the inter-cultural space aimed towards the growth of mutual influence and co-dependence of ethnic communities and nations. • A conviction regarding the necessity of interest in the effects of the mobility of people, ideas and goods, both concerning indiv...
View Full Document

  • Spring '20
  • Dr Lucy
  • cultural heritage, Jagiellonian University, Jagiellonian Library

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture