HWD101 WEEK1

HWD101 WEEK1 - The Power Supply"PSU 1 Power Supply Converts...

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1 The Power Supply “PSU”
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2 Power Supply Physically attached to case Converts AC to DC and then reduces it to the voltages required by the various computer components. Runs a fan directly from electrical output voltage to cool inside of case
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power supplies come in two basic types. Line switching. The switching line type uses a high speed oscillator circuit to generate different output voltages A switching power supply is more efficient in size, weight, and energy. Less heat is generated for the system to exhaust. Line switching type power supplies do not run without a load so if nothing is plugged into the power supply, the protection circuitry will shut it down. A disadvantage of switching supply is that it generates high-frequency (EMI) signals in the voltage conversion process, linear design. but linear design uses a large internal transformer to generate different output voltages. All energy wasted in a power supply, as heat has to be removed by the PC's cooling system Power supplies are encased in metal boxes for EMI shielding.
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4 Power Supply Form Factors Form Factors: A “Form Factor” is roughly defined as a specification of size, dimension and physical characteristics of hardware components Required since the electronic market expanded to included non-proprietary brands In general, the same form factor must be used for motherboard, case, and power supply
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Dimensions: The physical dimensions of the case. Normally these are specified as W (width) x D (depth) x H (height). May be given in inches (in) or millimetres (mm). Weight: The weight of the power supply, in pounds (lb) or kilograms (kg). One pound is 0.4536 kg. Motherboard Connectors: Normally the manufacturer will not state if the connectors are of the AT, ATX, or BTX varieties. You will have to decide this from the form factor specifications, and from looking at the number of pins listed for each connector. Drive Connectors: The number of drive connectors provided as standard equipment with the power supply.
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6 Power supply Form Factors in common use Prior to 1996: “AT” (Advanced Technology) Currently: “ATX” (Advanced Technology Extended) Newest: ATX12V for ATX & BTX EPS12V for EEB, CEB.
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Main Motherboard Connector: Main Motherboard Connector: This 20 / 24-pin connector is used by ATX12V 2.x motherboards and is directly connected to the computer motherboard power socket. This connector provides power to the integrated motherboard components such as the MCH, ICH, and Super I/O. Peripheral Connector: This 4-pin connector is generally used by hard disk drives, optical drives, or fans that have a motor in them. It is called the “Molex” after the designer .
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This note was uploaded on 05/17/2010 for the course CTY HWD101 taught by Professor Parker during the Winter '10 term at Seneca.

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HWD101 WEEK1 - The Power Supply"PSU 1 Power Supply Converts...

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