MT 203 Unit 7 Chapter 14.pdf.zip

MT 203 Unit 7 Chapter 14.pdf.zip - AP PHOTO/THE DAILY NEWS...

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© AP PHOTO/THE DAILY NEWS JOURNAL, JAE S. LEE
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chapter PART 5 Enhancing Employee-Management Relations 593 The Dynamics of Labor Relations 14 Identify and explain the principal federal laws that provide the framework for labor relations. After studying this chapter, you should be able to Explain the reasons employees join unions. Describe the process by which unions organize employees and gain recognition as their bargaining agent. Discuss the bargaining process and the bargaining goals and strategies of a union and an employer. Differentiate the forms of bargaining power that a union and an employer may utilize to enforce their bargaining demands. Describe a typical union grievance procedure and explain the basis for arbitration awards. Discuss some of the contemporary challenges to labor organizations. objective 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
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ention the word union and most people will have some opinion, positive or negative, regarding U.S. labor organizations. To some, the word evokes images of labor-management unrest—grievances, strikes, picketing, boycotts. To others, the word represents indus- trial democracy, fairness, opportunity, equal representation. Many think of unions as simply creating an adversarial relationship between employ- ees and managers. Regardless of attitudes toward them, since the mid-1800s unions have been an important force shaping organizational practices, legislation, and political thought in the United States. 1 Today unions remain of interest because of their influence on organizational productivity, U.S. competitiveness, the development of labor law, and HR policies and practices. Like business organizations themselves, unions are undergoing changes in both operation—such as mergers and coalitions—and phi- losophy. Furthermore, after years of declining membership, unions are again actively organizing unrepresented employees. For example, recently autoworkers have won representation rights for tens of thousands of workers at major U.S. auto parts makers including Johnson Controls, Collins and Aidman, Dana, Lear, and Metaldyne. 2 The Service Employees International Union, one of the nation’s fastest- growing unions, organized 9,000 employees at twenty hospitals owned by Catholic Health Care West. In 2004, large national unions such as the United Food and Com- mercial Workers and the Teamsters have joined hands to organize workers at Wal- Mart, the nation’s largest employer. 3 The AFL-CIO and national unions have tar- geted organizing as a top priority for the revival of the labor movement in the twenty-first century. In spite of the long history of unions, the intricacies of labor relations are unfa- miliar to many individuals. Therefore, this chapter describes government regulation of labor relations, the labor relations process, the reasons why workers join labor organizations, and the structure and leadership of labor unions. Importantly, accord- ing to labor law, once the union is certified to negotiate for bargaining-unit mem-
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This note was uploaded on 05/18/2010 for the course MT Marketing taught by Professor Jgh during the Spring '10 term at Kaplan University.

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MT 203 Unit 7 Chapter 14.pdf.zip - AP PHOTO/THE DAILY NEWS...

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