MT 203 Unit 3 Chapter 6.pdf.zip

MT 203 Unit 3 Chapter 6.pdf.zip - KIWAME ZIKOMO/SUPERSTOCK...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
© KIWAME ZIKOMO/SUPERSTOCK
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
chapter PART 3 Developing Effectiveness in Human Resources 243 Employee Selection 6 Explain the objectives of the personnel selection process. After studying this chapter, you should be able to Identify the various sources of information used for personnel selection. Illustrate the different approaches to conducting an employment interview. Describe the various decision strategies for selection. objective 1 2 3 4 5 Compare the value of different types of employment tests.
Background image of page 2
here is perhaps no more important topic in HRM than employee selection. If it is true that organizations succeed or fail on the basis of talents of employees, then managers directly influence that suc- cess by the people they hire. Regardless of whether the company is large or small, hiring the best and the brightest employees lays a strong foundation for excellence. Alternatively, it is common to hear managers who don’t recognize this point lament the inordinate amount of time they spend trying to fix bad selection decisions. In addition, equal employment opportunity legislation, court decisions, and the Uniform Guide- lines (discussed in Chapter 3) have also provided an impetus for making sure that the selection process is done well. The bottom line is, good selec- tion decisions make a difference. So do bad ones. Matching People and Jobs In conjunction with the recruiting process, which is designed to increase the number of applicants whose qualifications meet job requirements and the needs of the organization, selection is the process of reducing that number and choosing from among those individuals who have the relevant qualifications. Figure 6.1 shows in broad terms that the overall goal of selection is to maximize “hits” and avoid “misses.” Hits are accurate predictions and misses are inaccurate ones. The cost of one type of miss would be the direct and indirect expense of hiring an employee who turns out to be unsuccessful. The cost of the other type of miss is an opportunity cost—someone who could have been successful didn’t get a chance. While the overall selection program is often the formal responsibility of the HR department, line managers typically make the final decision about hiring people in their unit. It is important therefore that managers understand the objectives, policies, and practices used for selection. In that way, they can be highly involved in the process from the very beginning. Those responsible for making selection decisions should have adequate information upon which to base their decisions. Information about the jobs to be filled, knowledge of the ratio of job openings to the number of applicants, and as much relevant information as possible about the applicants them- selves are essential for making sound decisions.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 50

MT 203 Unit 3 Chapter 6.pdf.zip - KIWAME ZIKOMO/SUPERSTOCK...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online