The Nobel Prize 11 - N OBEL P R IZE - I ND IA The Nobel...

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Unformatted text preview: N OBEL P R IZE - I ND IA The Nobel Prizes, instituted in 1901, annually honour outstanding contributions to literature, world peace and various sciences. Thirteen Indian citizens or people of Indian origin have been honoured to date, but only three of these are or were Indian citizens, and seven of Indian origin. British-Raj Citizens Ronald Ross Ronald Ross, born in Almora, India, in 1857 was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1902 for his work on malaria. He received many honours in addition to the Nobel Prize, and was given Honorary Membership of learned societies of most countries of Europe, and of many other continents. He got an honorary M.D. degree in Stockholm in 1910 at the centenary celebration of the Caroline Institute. Whilst his vivacity and single-minded search for truth caused friction with some people, he enjoyed a vast circle of friends in Europe, Asia and America who respected him for his personality as well as for his genius. Rudyard Kipling Rudyard Kipling, born in Mumbai, 1865 (then Bombay in British India), was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1907. He remains the youngest-ever recipient and the first English-language writer to receive the Prize. Rabindranath Tagore Rabindranath Tagore (1861–1941) was a poet, philosopher, educationist, artist and social activist. Hailing from an affluent land-owning family of Bengal, he received traditional education in India before traveling to England for further study. He abandoned his formal education and returned home, founding a school, Santiniketan, where children received an education in consonance with Tagore's own ideas of communion with nature and emphasis on literature and the arts. In time, Tagore's works, written originally in Bengali, were translated into English; the Geetanjali ("Tribute in verse"), a compendium of verses, named 'Song Offerings' in English was widely acclaimed for its literary genius. In 1913, he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature. He was the first person of non-Western heritage to be awarded a Nobel Prize. In protest against the 1919 Jallianwala Bagh massacre, he resigned the knighthood that had been conferred upon him in 1915. Tagore holds the unique distinction of being the composer of the national anthems of two different countries, India and Bangladesh. Sir Chandrasekhara Venkata Raman Sir Chandrasekhara Venkata Raman (1888–1970) was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics for the year 1930. He had been knighted only the year before and worked extensively on acoustics and light. He was also deeply interested in the physiology of the human eye. A traditionally-dressed man, he headed an institute that is today named after him: the Raman Research Institute, Bangalore. His nephew, the astrophysicist Subramanyan Chandrasekhar, won the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1983 as a United States citizen....
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This note was uploaded on 05/18/2010 for the course MBA LOGIST 0942123018 taught by Professor Gupta during the Summer '10 term at 카이스트, 한국과학기술원.

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The Nobel Prize 11 - N OBEL P R IZE - I ND IA The Nobel...

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