00-3 - Working Paper No.2000/3 DEATH OF DISTANCE OR TYRANNY...

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Working Paper No.2000/3 DEATH OF DISTANCE OR TYRANNY OF DISTANCE? THE INTERNET, DETERRITORIALISATION, AND THE ANTI-GLOBALISATION MOVEMENT IN AUSTRALIA Ann Capling and Kim Richard Nossal Canberra October 2000 National Library of Australia Cataloguing-in-Publication Entry Capling, M. Ann (Margaret Ann), 1959– . Death of distance or tyranny of distance?: The internet, deterritorialisation, and the anti-globalisation movement in Australia. Bibliography. ISBN 0 7315 3108 6. 1. Social movements – Australia. 2. Globalization. 3. Internet (Computer network) – Political aspects – Australia. I. Nossal, Kim Richard. II. Title. (Series: Working paper (Australian National University. Dept. of International Relations); 2000/3). 322.40994 © Ann Capling and Kim Richard Nossal
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DEPARTMENT OF INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS WORKING PAPERS The department’s working paper series seeks to provide readers with access to current research on international relations. Reflecting the wide range of interest in the department, it will include topics on global international politics and the international political economy, the Asian–Pacific region and issues of concern to Australian foreign policy. Publication as a ‘Working Paper’ does not preclude subsequent publication in scholarly journals or books, indeed it may facilitate publication by providing feedback from readers to authors. Unless otherwise stated, publications of the Department of International Relations are presented without endorsement as contributions to the public record and debate. Authors are responsible for their own analysis and conclusions. Department of International Relations Research School of Pacific and Asian Studies Australian National University Canberra ACT Australia
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ABSTRACT Much of the analysis of the anti-globalisation movement has focused on the degree to which the Internet has played a crucial role in contemporary social movements. It is commonly argued that the net helps create ‘virtual communities’ that use the medium to exchange information, co-ordinate activities, and build and extend political support. Much of the commentary on the web as a means of political mobilisation stresses the degree to which the net compresses both space and time. Equally important in this view is the deterritorialised nature of on-line protest and diminution in importance of ‘place’ in current anti-globalisation campaigns. Our examination of the anti- globalisation movement in Australia leads us to a different conclusion. while the Internet does indeed compress time, it compresses space in a different and indeed quite variable way. This paper examines the way in which Australians protested against the MAI and the WTO meetings in Seattle and shows the differences in the nature of protest in each case. We conclude that crucial to an understanding of the differences was the considerable difference in the importance of ‘place’ in each case.
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1 DEATH OF DISTANCE OR TYRANNY OF DISTANCE? THE INTERNET, DETERRITORIALISATION, AND THE ANTI-
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This note was uploaded on 05/20/2010 for the course MARKETING 107 taught by Professor Vivian during the Spring '10 term at SCA NC.

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00-3 - Working Paper No.2000/3 DEATH OF DISTANCE OR TYRANNY...

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