Motivation - Motivation 1 Motivation can be defined as a...

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1 Motivation
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2 Motivation can be defined as a condition that is initiated by a physiological or psychological deficiency or need of an individual, which causes the individual to behave in a certain manner in order to achieve a particular goal or incentive. Physiological/ psychological deficiency (NEED) Achieve a particular goal (INCENTIVE) Individual behaves in a certain manner (DRIVE) Motivation consists of three interacting and interdependent elements – needs, drives and incentives. The Motivation Process
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3 Needs A physiological or psychological imbalance leads to the creation of a need. Drives Both physiological and psychological drives push an individual towards achieving a certain goal or accomplishing a certain task. Incentives Anything that can mitigate a need and decrease the intensity of a drive is called an incentive.
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4 CLASSIFICATION OF MOTIVES I) Primary Motives A motive is termed as a primary motive when it satisfies both the criteria – it is not learned, and it is physiologically based. The most common primary motives are hunger, thirst, sleep, sex , avoidance of pain and maternal concern.
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5 II) General Motives A motive is considered to be a general motive if it is not learned, but is also not based on physiological needs. General motives stimulate tension within the individual. The motives of curiosity, manipulation, motive to remain active and to display affection are examples of general motives.
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6 1)The curiosity, manipulation and activity motives The motives of curiosity, manipulation and activity are very beneficial for a person, as they often result in innovations and better ways of doing things. 2) The affection motive- for e.g. love sometimes resembles primary motive and sometimes secondary motive.
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7 III) Secondary Motives A secondary motive is a motive that has been learned or acquired over time. Important secondary motives are power, achievement and affiliation. These are commonly referred as nPow, nAch and nAff .
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8 1) The power motive Alfred Adler , a close associate of Sigmund Freud, placed more importance on the future and a person’s drive to gain power and prove himself superior to others . A person tries to compensate for the feelings of inferiority and also tries to fulfill his innate need for power, which is then reflected in his lifestyle.
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9 2) The achievement motive David C. McClelland , a Harvard psychologist, has conducted extensive research on different aspects of achievement. According to him, the achievement motive is a person’s desire to perform excellently or to handle complex or competitive situations successfully .
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10 3) The affiliation motive Employees, especially those at the lower levels of the organizational hierarchy, have a strong desire to belong to and be accepted by other employees or the whole group. People with a
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Motivation - Motivation 1 Motivation can be defined as a...

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