(LTR) DICTIONARY OF LITERARY TERMS

(LTR) DICTIONARY OF LITERARY TERMS - DICTIONARY OF LITERARY...

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DICTIONARY OF LITERARY TERMS Allegory A symbolic narrative in which the surface details imply a secondary meaning. Allegory often takes the form of a story in which the characters represent moral qualities. The most famous example in English is John Bunyan's Pilgrim's Progress , in which the name of the central character, Pilgrim, epitomizes the book's allegorical nature. Kay Boyle's story "Astronomer's Wife" and Christina Rossetti's poem "Up-Hill" both contain allegorical elements. Alliteration The repetition of consonant sounds, especially at the beginning of words. Example: "Fetched fresh, as I suppose, off some sweet wood." Hopkins, "In the Valley of the Elwy." Allusion A reference to a person, place, object, or event outside the work itself. Amphitheater A large, semicircular, outdoor theater, seating as many as 15,000 people, where Greek dramas were performed. Anapest Two unaccented syllables followed by an accented one, as in com-pre-HEND or in-ter-VENE . An anapestic meter rises to the accented beat as in Byron's lines from "The Destruction of Sennacherib": "And the sheen of their spears was like stars on the sea, / When the blue wave rolls nightly on deep Galilee." Antagonist A character or force against which another character struggles. Creon is Antigone's antagonist in Sophocles' play Antigone ; Teiresias is the antagonist of Oedipus in Sophocles' Oedipus the King . Antistrophe In Greek drama, that part of the ode in which the chorus moves from left to right, singing and dancing. Apostrophe Addressing an inanimate object, a place, or an absent or imaginary person as if it were alive or present. Aside Words spoken by an actor directly to the audience, which are not "heard" by the other characters on stage during a play. In Shakespeare's Othello , Iago voices his inner thoughts a number of times as "asides" for the play's audience. Assonance The repetition of similar vowel sounds in a sentence or a line of poetry or prose, as in "I rose and
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told him of my woe." Whitman's "When I Heard the Learn'd Astronomer" contains assonantal "I's" in the following lines: "How soon unaccountable I became tired and sick, / Till rising and gliding out I wander'd off by myself." Aubade A love lyric in which the speaker complains about the arrival of the dawn, when he must part from his lover. John Donne's "The Sun Rising" exemplifies this poetic genre. Author/Speaker/Narrator The author is the person who writes the literary work. He or she should not be confused with the speaker , the voice that is heard in a poem, or the narrator , the voice that tells a work of fiction (or, sometimes, frames a play). Ballad A narrative poem written in four-line stanzas , characterized by swift action and narrated in a direct style. The Anonymous medieval ballad, "Barbara Allan," exemplifies the genre. Belles-lettres
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(LTR) DICTIONARY OF LITERARY TERMS - DICTIONARY OF LITERARY...

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