Lesson29MethodsOfEvaluation

Lesson29MethodsOfEvaluation - Copy Right: Rai University...

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Unformatted text preview: Copy Right: Rai University 11.672.2 275 M A N A G E M E N T O F T R A I N I N G A N D D E V E L O P M E N T Kirkpatricks Four Levels of Evaluation Assessing Training Effectiveness Often entails using the four-level model developed by Donald Kirkpatrick (1994). According to this model, evaluation should always begin with level one, and then, as time and budget allows, should move sequentially through levels two, three, and four. Information from each prior level serves as a base for the next levels evaluation. Thus, each successive level represents a more precise measure of the effectiveness of the training program, but at the same time requires a more rigorous and time-consuming analysis. In Kirkpatricks four-level model, each successive evalua- tion level is built on information provided by the lower level Level 1 Evaluation - Reactions Just as the word implies, evaluation at this level measures how participants in a training program react to it. It attempts to answer questions regarding the participants perceptions - Did they like it? Was the material relevant to their work? This type of evaluation is often called a smilesheet. According to Kirkpatrick, every program should at least be evaluated at this level to provide for the improvement of a training program. In addition, the participants reactions have important conse- quences for learning (level two). Although a positive reaction does not guarantee learning, a negative reaction almost certainly reduces its possibility. Level 2 Evaluation - Learning Assessing at this level moves the evaluation beyond learner satisfaction and attempts to assess the extent students have advanced in skills, knowledge, or attitude. Measurement at this level is more difficult and laborious than level one. Methods range from formal to informal testing to team assessment and self-assessment. If possible, participants take the test or assessment before the training (pretest) and after training (post test) to determine the amount of learning that has occurred. To assess the amount of learning that has occurred due to a training program, level two evaluations often use tests conducted before training (pretest) and after training (post test). Level 3 Evaluation - Transfer This level measures the transfer that has occurred in learners behavior due to the training program. Evaluating at this level attempts to answer the question - Are the newly acquired skills, knowledge, or attitude being used in the everyday environment of the learner? For many trainers this level represents the truest assessment of a programs effectiveness. However, measuring at this level is difficult as it is often impossible to predict when the change in behavior will occur, and thus requires important decisions in terms of when to evaluate, how often to evaluate, and how to evaluate....
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Lesson29MethodsOfEvaluation - Copy Right: Rai University...

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