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ECE155ALecture9

ECE155ALecture9 - Computer Networks Lecture 9 Professor...

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1 Computer Networks Lecture 9 Professor Louise E. Moser Winter 2010
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2 Medium Access Control Sublayer IEEE 802 standards 802.3 – Wired LAN - Ethernet 802.2 – Logical link control where 802.3 and 802.11 converge 802.11 – Wireless LAN (Wi-Fi) 802.15.1 – Wireless PAN - Bluetooth 802.15.4 – Wireless PAN - ZigBee 802.16 – Broadband Wireless (WiMAX)
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3 802.15.1 Bluetooth 802.15.1 Overview 802.15.1 Applications 802.15.1 Architecture 802.15.1 Protocol Stack 802.15.1 Frame Structure
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4 802.15.1 Bluetooth A standard for interconnecting computing and communication devices and accessories using short-range, low-power, inexpensive wireless radios Named after Harald Blaatand (Bluetooth) II (940-981), a Viking king who unified Denmark and Norway Bluetooth SIG: Formed by Ericsson, IBM, Intel, Nokia, Toshiba Bluetooth SIG issued a 1500-page v1.0 spec in 1999 802.15.1 standardizes the Physical and Data Link Layers As a Personal Area Network (PAN) standard
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5 Bluetooth Applications Generic services Networking Telephony Exchanging objects
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6 Bluetooth Architecture Piconet – Consists of a master node and up to 7 active slave nodes within 10 meters, and up to 255 parked nodes Master node – Controls the clock and determines which device gets to communicate in which time slot, using TDM Slave nodes – Are dumb, just do what the master tells them Parked nodes – Devices that the master has switched to a low-power state; respond only to an activation or beacon signal from the master All communication is between the master and a slave; there is no direct slave-to-slave communication Scatternet – Collection of piconets interconnected via bridge slaves
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7 Bluetooth Protocol Stack 802.15.1 Bluetooth protocol stack
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8 Bluetooth Protocol Stack Physical radio layer – Deals with radio transmission and modulation Low-power system with a range of 10 meters operating in the 2.4 GHz band Band is divided into 79 channels of 1 MHz each Modulation is frequency shift keying (discrete frequency changes where 1 high frequency and 0 low frequency) with 1 bit per Hz => aggregate data rate is 1 Mbps Frequency hop spread spectrum, with 1600 hops/sec and dwell time of 625 μ sec All nodes within a piconet hop simultaneously with the master dictating the hop sequence
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9 Bluetooth Protocol Stack Baseband layer – Deals with how the master controls time slots and how time slots are grouped into frames Master defines a sequence of 625 μ sec time slots Master uses even slots, slaves use odd slots Frames can be 1, 3, or 5 slots long A settling time of 250-260 μ sec per hop allows the radio signal to stabilize If more slots per frame, still only one settling time per hop and the same size access code and header => more bits for data Each frame is transmitted over a logical channel (called a link)
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