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Wastewater_Microbiology

Wastewater_Microbiology - EVEG 3110 :Wastewater...

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    Wastewater Microbiology EVEG 3110 March 18, 2003
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    Role of Microorganisms: Wastewater Stabilization of Organic Matter Removal of Nitrogen Degradation of Toxic Contaminants
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    Role of Microorganisms: Wastewater Stabilization of Organic Matter Microorganisms convert colloidal and souble organic carbon into physical biomass (cell tissue) and gases (biological treatment) Cell tissue (protoplasm) is easier to separate from the liquid waste stream (biomass separation from wastewater by sedimentation in secondary clarification)
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    Classification of Microorganisms Kingdom Carbon & Energy Source Relationship with Oxygen Preferred Temperature Regime Shape
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    Kingdoms Animalia : elephants, rotifers Plantae : ferns, some algae Fungi : mushrooms, yeast Protista : amoebas, some algae Monera : BACTERIA Bacteria are NOT plants (contrary to your book) 5 Kingdoms vs 3 Domains (Bacteria, Archaea, Eukarya) Eukaryote Prokaryote What is a virus?
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    Terminology Eukaryotic Cell – A type of cell with a membrane-enclosed NUCLEUS and membrane-enclosed organelles. Present in protists, plants, fungi, and animals; also called eukaryote. Prokaryotic Cell – A type of cell lacking a membrane-enclosed nucleus and membrane- enclosed organelles. Found only in the domains Bacteria and Archaea; also called prokaryote
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    Carbon Source Heterotrophic Bacteria (heterotrophs) Obtain their carbon from organic material Literally means feeding from sources other than ones self Autotrophic Bacteria (autotrophs) Obtain carbon from inorganic material, mainly CO 2 . Autotrophs make organic molecules out of inorganic material.
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    Energy Source Phototrophs Organisms that rely only on the sun for energy
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