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LectureNotes5 - ECS 120 Lesson 5 Nondeterministic Finite...

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Unformatted text preview: ECS 120 Lesson 5 Nondeterministic Finite State Machines Oliver Kreylos Monday, April 9th, 2001 Before we prove the closure of regular languages under concatenation and Kleene Star, we introduce another type of finite automaton that will make the proofs a lot easier. 1 Nondeterministic Finite State Machines Until now, the transition function for an automaton M = ( Q, ,,q ,F ) was restricted by requiring that for each state q Q and every charac- ter a , there was exactly one other state q Q such that ( q,a ) = q . This made a total function. We will henceforth call machines of this re- stricted type deterministic finite automata (DFA) . A new type of machine, called nondeterministic finite automaton (NFA) , is created by dropping the restriction on . There are three differences between the transition function of an NFA and that of a DFA, see Figure 1: There can be states with more than one arrow leaving for the same input symbol (see state q and symbol 1 in Fig. 1). There can be states with no arrows leaving for an input symbol (see state q 2 and symbol in Fig. 1). There can be arrows labelled with the special symbol (see state q 1 in Fig. 1). How does the computation of an NFA differ from that of a DFA? To recall, a DFA computes by starting in its start state, and following a chain of 1 q q 1 q 2 1 1 1 1 Figure 1: An NFA M over the alphabet = { , 1 } . states labeled by the sequence of characters read, see Figure 2. An NFA, on the other hand, computes by following a tree of state chains starting at its start state, see Figure 3. Here are the three ways in which NFA computation differs from DFA computation: If the machine reads a character with multiple arrows leaving from the current state, it will branch the chain of states and follow all those arrows simultaneously. If the machine reads a character with no arrows leaving from the current state, the chain of states will die, i. e., it will terminate prematurely....
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This note was uploaded on 05/20/2010 for the course ECS 120 taught by Professor Filkov during the Spring '07 term at UC Davis.

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LectureNotes5 - ECS 120 Lesson 5 Nondeterministic Finite...

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