Apr.%2012-14

Apr.%2012-14 - Nicholas I (1825-1855): Began trend of...

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Bylini, in Conclusion
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Bylina Vs. Fairytale Form and style Bogatyr vs. Ivan the Peasant’s Son Change or transformation of hero Formulaic, but not strictly ordered
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Literary Fairytales
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Literary Fairytales in Europe Coincides with invention of the printing press and rise of literacy Represent the values of the writer and the changing values of society: example, “Rumplestiltskin” Excluded the majority of the population An unchanging form
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Other Characteristics Literary fairytales have an identifiable author They often have a moral or lesson They can address social issues such as obligations, gender roles, class differences, etc. Form
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Folklore and Fairytales in the 19th Century In Literature and the Arts
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Early 19th-Century: Russian Writers Alexander Pushkin (1799-1837): Russia’s greatest national poet; “Tsar Saltan,” “The Golden Cockerel,” Eugene Onegin Nikolai Gogol (1809-1852): “Viy,” “St. John’s Eve,” “A May Night”
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Mid-19th Century
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Unformatted text preview: Nicholas I (1825-1855): Began trend of Russian Nationalism Rejection of Western influences Concerted effort to record and preserve traditional Russian music, folk culture, folktales, etc. Late 19th-Century: Music The Mighty Handful: sought to create uniquely Russian music Wrote songs, ballets, operas, all with a national theme Modest Mussorgsky: Night on Bald Mountain; Sorochintsy Fair Rimsky-Korsakov: A May Night ; Tsar Saltan ; The Golden Cockerel; Sadko Pyotr Tchaikovsky Most well-known Russian composer outside Russia Works inspired by traditional Russian music but trained in classical Western tradition The Nutcracker ; Swan Lake Late 19th-Century: Art The Wanderers: sought to create an entirely national art Created historical scenes, landscapes, images of daily life, famous figures, etc., all with a national theme Traveled to display art to all classes...
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This note was uploaded on 05/21/2010 for the course RUSS 2231 taught by Professor Ragland,ka during the Summer '08 term at Colorado.

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Apr.%2012-14 - Nicholas I (1825-1855): Began trend of...

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