2-5 examples - Student: Grady Silnonton Colu'se:...

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Unformatted text preview: Student: Grady Silnonton Colu'se: 1\-Iat11119: Elementaiy Statistics - Spring 3010 - C‘RN: 49339 Instructor: Shawn Pan-ini - 16 weeks Date: 3.-"'18.-"'10 Book: T1‘iola: Elementaiy Statistics. 11e Time: 11:14 AM The graph to the right compares teaching salaries of women Salaries ($) and men at private colleges and universities. What 80000— impression does the graph create? Does the graph depict the meow data fairly? If not, construct a graph that depicts the data fairly. 60000— 50000_Women Men Some graphs are bad in the sense that they contain errors, and some are bad because they are technically correct, but misleading. It is important to develop the ability to recognize bad graphs and to identify exactly how they are misleading. To determine the impression the graph creates, compare the heights of the bars in the graph. Notice that the bar representing men's salaries is about twice as high as the bar representing women's salaries. This creates the impression that men have salaries that are more than twice the salaries of women. Some graphs are misleading because one or both of the axes begin at some value other than zero. so that differences are exaggerated. The vertical scale in the graph starts at 50,000. Because the vertical scale does not start at zero, the graph is misleading. To construct a graph that depict the data fairly, start the vertical scale at zero. The graph shown to the right depicts the data more fairly. Salaries ($) 80000— Men Page 1 Student: Grady Silnonton Colu'se: Mathll9: Elelnentaiy Statistics - Spring 2010 - CRN: 49339 Instructor: Shawn Pan-ini - 16 weeks Date: 3f18-"10 Book: T1'iola: ElenIentaiy Statistics. 11e Time: 11:14 AM The graph to the right uses cylinders to Daily Oil Consmnption represent barrels of oil consumed by two (Millions Ofbal‘l‘elsl countries. Does the graph distort the data or does it depict the data fairly? Why or why not? If the graph distorts the data, construct a graph that depicts the data fairly. Countly A C‘ountly B Some graphs are bad in the sense that they contain errors, and some are bad because they are technically correct, but misleading. Drawings of objects, called pictographs, are often misleading. When comparing one—dimensional measurements, using volumes to compare them distorts the differences. For example, if you double the radius of a cylinder, it increases the volume by a factor of eight. The number ofbarrels consumed is a one-dimensional measurement, but the graph uses objects of volume, so the difference in consumption between the two countries appears to be much larger than it actually is. This does not depict the data fairly. A fairer depiction of the data would be a linear form of graph, such as a bar graph. When constructing a bar graph, make sure it is not misleading. If an axis does not begin at zero, differences can be exaggerated. The graph shown to the right depicts the data more fairly. Oil Consumption Country Page 1 Student: Grady Sinlonton Colu'se: 1\-Iat11119: Elenlentaiy Statistics - Spring 3010 - C‘RN: 49339 Instructor: Shawn Pan-'ini - 16 weeks Date: 3.-"'18.-"'10 Book: T1‘iola: Elenlentaiy Statistics. 11e Time: 11:16 AM The graph to the right shows the braking distances for different cars measured under the same conditions. Describe the ways in which this graph Car A might be deceptive. How much greater is the braking distance of Car A than Car Br the braking distance of Car C'.’ Draw the graph in a way that depicts the data Car C more fairly. _'_'_'_'_| 100120140160180 200 Braking distance (fcct) Some graphs are bad in the sense that they contain errors, and some are bad because they are technically correct, but misleading. It is important to develop the ability to recognize bad graphs and to identify exactly how they are misleading. Some graphs are misleading because one or both of the axes begin at some value other than zero, so that differences are exaggerated. The horizontal scale in the graph starts at 100 ft, cutting offportions of the bars. This creates the impression that the braking distance ofCar A is more than twice the distance of the other cars. The graph is deceptive because it exaggerates the differences among the cars. To determine how much greater the braking distance of Car A is than the braking distance of Car C, divide the braking distance for Car A by the braking distance for Car C. Then subtract 1 and multiply by 100% to find the percentage difference between braking distances. A comparison of the actual numbers shows that the braking distance ofCar A is roughly 40% more than that ofCar C, not 100% more. To draw the graph in a way that depicts the data more fairly, reconstruct the graph so that the horizontal scales starts at zero. The graph shown to the right depicts the data more fairly. Car Car Car 0 40 80 120160 200 Braking Distance (feet) Page 1 ...
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This note was uploaded on 05/21/2010 for the course MATH 49239 taught by Professor Parvini during the Spring '10 term at Mesa CC.

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2-5 examples - Student: Grady Silnonton Colu'se:...

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