Hunger and Satiety A Physiological View

Hunger and Satiety A Physiological View - Running Head:...

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Running Head: HUNGER AND SATIETY A PHYSIOLOGICAL VIEW 1 Gary D. Neer Hunger and Satiety: A Physiological View PSY/240 Thea Lawton December 19, 2009
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HUNGER AND SATIETY 2 Hunger and Satiety Hello, my name is Gary Neer. I am a student attending the University of Phoenix currently majoring in Psychology. Through my studies, I have found that there are several physiological factors and psychological influences that contribute to hunger and satiety. Additionally, how these factors have a say to such eating disorders as Anorexia Nervosa, Bulimia Nervosa, and Compulsive Overeating. Today we will be discussing these physiological contributors and some of the physiological myths about hunger and satiety. I hope this discussion will help everyone to understand how proper nutrition can assist in keep the body and the mind healthy. Hunger is a feeling that serves as a biological maintenance and survival mechanism (Rozin, 1996). Despite beliefs that hunger is caused biologically, the motivation of hunger is believed to be controlled by physiologically contributions and psychological influence. What constructs a human from other species is humans not only eat to satiate physiological hunger, but to nourish the mind satisfying psychological hunger. Although these two types of hunger interchangeably cause need by affecting one another, putting food in the mouth is not the proper way to feed our psychological appetite but proper nutrient is a way to feed our psychological and physiologically need. Problems like eating disorders and obesity are influences because we keep trying to quench a psychological hunger by eating or not eating food. Until we understand the need to properly nourish rather than feeding the body and the mind, we will not be able to be satisfied. Thus, hunger is not just about physiological body changes; it is about how our body and mind together are nutritiously fed to work as one.
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HUNGER AND SATIETY 3 Physiological Myths of Hunger and Satiety Hunger and satiation are sensations with no direct connection to any particular body part or organ (Magidenko, 2007). However, there are physiological myths about hunger and satiety that trigger the motivation regulating our eating behavior. One part of the brain , t he lateral hypothalamus, is said to activate producing a signal to look for food (Pinel, 2007). Once an individual is full, fat cells begin releasing a hormone leptin. This hormone stimulates the ventromedial nuclei setting in motion a signal to discontinue eating . Additional, this component influences the feeding behavior by regulating satiety (Pinel, 2007). However, if the nerve cells in the hypothalamus are destroy, satiety increases, or decreases causing obesity or weight loss. Humans feel satiety at the brain level because of the function of the Ventromedial Nuclei.
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This note was uploaded on 05/23/2010 for the course PSY/240 PSY/240 taught by Professor Axiacollege during the Spring '07 term at University of Phoenix.

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Hunger and Satiety A Physiological View - Running Head:...

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