Gov-10elections

Gov-10elections - Lecture10:Elections&Campaigns Matisoff...

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Click to edit Master subtitle style 5/24/10 Matisoff – POL 1101
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5/24/10 Americans vote for candidates
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5/24/10 Congressional Elections (1932-2000) House generally controlled by Democrats (83% of the time) Presidency more contested (Republicans = 44.5% of the time) Winner gets more than 55% of the vote In house races incumbent wins most of the time Usually within >60% of the vote Fewer people vote in congressional elections during
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5/24/10 How to become a Presidential Candidate 1. Get “mentioned” as one of “presidential caliber” Off the record remarks Be a governor of a big state Get identified with major piece of legislation 2. Set aside time to run, especially if you are only mentioned, and not well known Reagan spent 6+ years running 3. Have a military or governor background / be a war hero Eisenhower, Bush I, Bush II, Clinton, Reagan, Carter
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This note was uploaded on 05/23/2010 for the course POL 1101 taught by Professor White during the Spring '07 term at Georgia Tech.

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Gov-10elections - Lecture10:Elections&Campaigns Matisoff...

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