AHTRO105 - Record:1 Title: DownontheBodyFarm. Authors:...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Record: 1 Title: Down on the Body Farm. Authors: Pedersen, Daniel Source: Newsweek; 10/23/2000, Vol. 136 Issue 17, p50, 3p, 7 color Document Type: Article Subject Terms: FORENSIC sciences BIODEGRADATION UNIVERSITY of Tennessee (Knoxville, Tenn.) HUMAN biology Geographic Terms: TENNESSEE KNOXVILLE (Tenn.) UNITED States Abstract: Focuses on the Body Farm at the University of Tennessee Medical Center  in Knoxville. Purpose of the Farm which is to research the decomposition  of human bodies; Importance of solving crimes which often relies on a  victim's time of death; How the United States Federal Bureau of  Investigation is sending agents to the Farm for training; Goals of the Farm  which includes providing an atlas for law enforcement officials on  decomposition. Full Text Word Count: 1366 ISSN: 0028-9604 Accession Number: 3664641 Persistent link to this record (Permalink):
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx? Cut and Paste: <A href="http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx? Farm.</A> Database: Business Source Premier DOWN ON THE BODY FARM The only place on earth dedicated to studying human decay in order to  advance the science of crime busting The air smells sickeningly sweet, with honeysuckle and death. The Body  Farm--the only place in the world where corpses rot in the open air to  advance human knowledge--sits on a wooded hillside an easy three- minute stroll from the University of Tennessee Medical Center in Knoxville.  Not everyone comes here voluntarily. The cadaver under the honeysuckle,  for instance, had been shot in the chest and abdomen after a drug deal  gone wrong 10 days earlier. No one knows what happened to his headless  neighbor 20 feet away--a woman found floating last summer in the  Tennessee River. William Bass III, 73, the Body Farm's founder, doesn't  find the scene ghoulish. "I see this as a scientific challenge," he says, as  maggots work efficiently on 20 or so corpses decomposing in the early  autumn sun. Then Bass uses a gloved hand to lift a rotting limb. Ask any detective. Solving a crime--from a drug-cartel hit to a garden- variety murder--often depends upon pinpointing the time of death. To do so  requires the empirical study of decomposing humans; this humble site in  Tennessee is the world's foremost laboratory for doing just that. (A key  character in Patricia Cornwell's best-selling novel "The Body Farm," 
Background image of page 2
pathologist Lyall Shade, was based loosely on Bass.) But Bass's life work  is no fiction. Only 61 American anthropologists now apply their broad-
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 7

AHTRO105 - Record:1 Title: DownontheBodyFarm. Authors:...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online